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Darwin-L Message Log 31: 1–22 — March 1996

Academic Discussion on the History and Theory of the Historical Sciences

Darwin-L was an international discussion group on the history and theory of the historical sciences, active from 1993–1997. Darwin-L was established to promote the reintegration of a range of fields all of which are concerned with reconstructing the past from evidence in the present, and to encourage communication among scholars, scientists, and researchers in these fields. The group had more than 600 members from 35 countries, and produced a consistently high level of discussion over its several years of operation. Darwin-L was not restricted to evolutionary biology nor to the work of Charles Darwin, but instead addressed the entire range of historical sciences from an explicitly comparative perspective, including evolutionary biology, historical linguistics, textual transmission and stemmatics, historical geology, systematics and phylogeny, archeology, paleontology, cosmology, historical geography, historical anthropology, and related “palaetiological” fields.

This log contains public messages posted to the Darwin-L discussion group during March 1996. It has been lightly edited for format: message numbers have been added for ease of reference, message headers have been trimmed, some irregular lines have been reformatted, and error messages and personal messages accidentally posted to the group as a whole have been deleted. No genuine editorial changes have been made to the content of any of the posts. This log is provided for personal reference and research purposes only, and none of the material contained herein should be published or quoted without the permission of the original poster.

The master copy of this log is maintained in the Darwin-L Archives (rjohara.net/darwin) by Dr. Robert J. O’Hara. The Darwin-L Archives also contain additional information about the Darwin-L discussion group, the complete Today in the Historical Sciences calendar for every month of the year, a collection of recommended readings on the historical sciences, and an account of William Whewell’s concept of “palaetiology.”


-------------------------------------------
DARWIN-L MESSAGE LOG 31: 1-22 -- MARCH 1996
-------------------------------------------

DARWIN-L
A Network Discussion Group on the
History and Theory of the Historical Sciences

Darwin-L@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu is an international network discussion group on
the history and theory of the historical sciences.  Darwin-L was established
in September 1993 to promote the reintegration of a range of fields all of
which are concerned with reconstructing the past from evidence in the present,
and to encourage communication among academic professionals in these fields.
Darwin-L is not restricted to evolutionary biology nor to the work of Charles
Darwin but instead addresses the entire range of historical sciences from an
interdisciplinary perspective, including evolutionary biology, historical
linguistics, textual transmission and stemmatics, historical geology,
systematics and phylogeny, archeology, paleontology, cosmology, historical
anthropology, historical geography, and related "palaetiological" fields.

This log contains the public messages posted to Darwin-L during March 1996.
It has been lightly edited for format: message numbers have been added for ease
of reference, message headers have been trimmed, some irregular lines have been
reformatted, and some administrative messages and personal messages posted to
the group as a whole have been deleted.  No genuine editorial changes have been
made to the content of any of the posts.  This log is provided for personal
reference and research purposes only, and none of the material contained herein
should be published or quoted without the permission of the original poster.
The master copy of this log is maintained in the archives of Darwin-L by
listserv@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu, and is also available on the Darwin-L Web Server
at http://rjohara.uncg.edu.  For instructions on how to retrieve copies of this
and other log files, and for additional information about Darwin-L, send the
e-mail message INFO DARWIN-L to listserv@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu, or connect to
the Darwin-L Web Server.

Darwin-L is administered by Robert J. O'Hara (darwin@iris.uncg.edu), Center for
Critical Inquiry in the Liberal Arts and Department of Biology, University of
North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina 27412 U.S.A., and it
is supported by the Center for Critical Inquiry, University of North Carolina
at Greensboro, and the Department of History and the Academic Computing Center,
University of Kansas.

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:1>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Fri Mar  1 00:30:47 1996

Date: Fri, 01 Mar 1996 01:30:25 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: List owner's monthly greeting
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

Greetings to all Darwin-L subscribers.  On the first of every month I send
out a short note on the status of our group, along with a reminder of basic
commands.  For additional information about the group please visit the
Darwin-L Web Server (http://rjohara.uncg.edu).

Darwin-L is an international discussion group for professionals in the
historical sciences.  The group is not devoted to any particular discipline,
such as evolutionary biology, but rather seeks to promote interdisciplinary
comparisons across the entire range of "palaetiology", including evolution,
historical linguistics, archeology, geology, cosmology, historical geography,
textual transmission, and history proper.  Darwin-L currently has more than
700 members from over 35 countries.

Because Darwin-L does have a large membership and is sometimes a high-volume
discussion group it is important for all participants to try to keep their
postings as substantive as possible so that we can maintain a favorable
"signal-to-noise" ratio.  Personal messages should be sent by private e-mail
rather than to the group as a whole.  Subscribers who feel burdened from
time to time by the volume of their Darwin-L mail may wish to take advantage
of the "digest" option described below.

Because different mail systems work differently, not all subscribers see
the e-mail address of the original sender of each message in the message
header (some people only see "Darwin-L" as the source).  It is therefore
very important to include your name and e-mail address at the end of every
message you post so that everyone can identify you and reply privately if
appropriate.  Remember also that in most cases when you type "reply" in
response to a message from Darwin-L your reply is sent to the group as a
whole, rather than to the original sender.

The following are the most frequently used listserv commands that Darwin-L
members may wish to know.  All of these commands should be sent as regular
e-mail messages to the listserv address (listserv@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu),
not to the address of the group as a whole (Darwin-L@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu).
In each case leave the subject line of the message blank and include no
extraneous text, as the command will be read and processed by the listserv
program rather than by a person.  To join the group send the message:

     SUBSCRIBE DARWIN-L Your Name

     For example: SUBSCRIBE DARWIN-L John Smith

To cancel your subscription send the message:

     UNSUBSCRIBE DARWIN-L

If you feel burdened by the volume of mail you receive from Darwin-L you
may instruct the listserv program to deliver mail to you in digest format
(one message per day consisting of the whole day's posts bundled together).
To receive your mail in digest format send the message:

     SET DARWIN-L MAIL DIGEST

To change your subscription from digest format back to one-at-a-time
delivery send the message:

     SET DARWIN-L MAIL ACK

To temporarily suspend mail delivery (when you go on vacation, for example)
send the message:

     SET DARWIN-L MAIL POSTPONE

To resume regular delivery send either the DIGEST or ACK messages above.

For a comprehensive introduction to Darwin-L with notes on our scope and
on network etiquette, and a summary of all available commands, send the
message:

     INFO DARWIN-L

To post a public message to the group as a whole simply send it as regular
e-mail to the group's address (Darwin-L@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu).

I thank you all for your continuing interest in Darwin-L and in the
interdisciplinary study of the historical sciences.

Bob O'Hara, Darwin-L list owner

Dr. Robert J. O'Hara (darwin@iris.uncg.edu)
Senior Tutor, Cornelia Strong College
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Greensboro, North Carolina 27412 U.S.A.

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:2>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Fri Mar  1 10:03:11 1996

Date: Fri, 01 Mar 1996 11:02:35 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: New list on GIS in archeology (fwd from new-lists)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

--begin forward message----------------

Date: Thu, 22 Feb 1996 14:47:12 +0000 (GMT)
From: Elaine Blair <E.H.Blair@newcastle.ac.uk>
Subject: new list gisarch on Mailbase
To: new-lists@mailbase.ac.uk (new-lists)

                +-----------------------------------------+
                |                                         |
                | A NEW LIST HAS BEEN STARTED ON MAILBASE |
                |                                         |
                +-----------------------------------------+

It is called gisarch

Its description reads:

This list is intended to facilitate discussion between archaeologists
making use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology.

To join this list, mail to:

        mailbase@mailbase.ac.uk

a message containing only the following text (substituting appropriately):

        join gisarch firstname(s) lastname

For further information relating to this new list, contact its owner at

         gisarch-request@mailbase.ac.uk

Elaine Blair, Mailbase User Group Support Officer,
Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, NE1 7RU
Tel: 0191 222 8080  E-mail: e.h.blair@newcastle.ac.uk
URL: http://www.mailbase.ac.uk/

--end forwarded message----------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:3>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Fri Mar  1 10:06:47 1996

Date: Fri, 01 Mar 1996 11:06:33 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Summer course on origin of Mediterranean flora (fwd from
 plant-taxonomy)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

--begin forwarded message--------------

Date: Mon, 26 Feb 1996 18:05:54 +0100 (MET)
From: Diogo Figueiredo <dcf@uevora.pt>
Subject: SUMMER COURSE- MEDITERRANEAN FLORA
To: plant-taxonomy@mailbase.ac.uk

SUMMER SCHOOLS - PORTUGAL - EVORA96
ORIGIN, EVOLUTION AND CONSERVATION OF MEDITERRANEAN FLORA

Location: University of Evora - Portugal

Starting date: 5 August to 16 August

Lecturer: Dr. Chris Wilcock (University of Aberdeen)

The Course: The aims and objectives of the course are threefold:

a) To provide a biogeographical framework for understanting the origin
and evolution of plant communities in the Mediterranean.

b) To study the morphological and reproductive chracteristics of plants
of the mediterranean region, using both field and laboratory work.

c) To introduce the issue of biodiversity evalution in the context of the
Mediterranean flora and provide a regional case-study for discussion and
application of different methodologies.

Further information: If you require more information about our courses we
will be only too pelased to help. You can contact us in the following ways:

C/o Miguel Araujo
Centro de Ecologia Aplicada
Universidade de Evora
Largo dos Colegiais
7000 Evora
PORTUGAL

by tel: +351 66 740868
or by fax: +351 66 744968
or by email: ceaue@evunix.uevora.pt

--end forwarded message----------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:4>From Eliana@attach.edu.ar Fri Mar  1 06:59:22 1996

From: Eliana@attach.edu.ar
Organization:  Attachment Research Center
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Date: 	Fri, 1 Mar 1996 09:22:30 -0300
Subject: Aggression-Psychology on the Net

Hello Darwin-Lers,

Let me announce the launching of a new forum of discussions on
Aggression issues:

Aggression-Psychology on Listserv@sjuvm.stjohns.edu - Discussions on
                                    the Psychology of Aggression

   Aggression-Psychology is a moderated mailing list devoted to the
   study and discussion of the antecedents, development,
   manifestations, regulation and reduction of aggressive behavior.

   Consideration of prosocial behaviors of cooperation and conflict
   resolution in the context of constructive alternatives to
   aggression is appropriate. Aggression is viewed as a
   multidetermined behaviour influenced, in varying degrees, by
   biological, socialization, experiential, cultural and situational
   factors. Aggression is expressed at many different societal levels
   - the individual, familial, social group, institutional, national,
   international, and discussions of aggression at any of these
   levels are appropriate for the mailing list. Aggression may occur
   in varied forms and varied contexts. It may be physical; it may be
   verbal; it may or may not be acc ompanied by anger; it may be
   revengeful, instrumental to some other goal, or may seem
   purposeless. It may vary in the degree of injury inflicted. It may
   tak e place in the home, in school. on the street, at the
   workplace, or on the on the battlefield. The orientation of this
   mailing list is guided by a specific belief and value- namely,
   that, in general, lethal aggression in humans is a pernicious evil
   that in the great majority of instances needs to be eliminated and
   more constructive alternatives found.

   Hence, scholars and students of human and non-human aggression
   from every body of knowledge are welcome to join in.

   To subscribe to AGGRESSION-PSYCHOLOGY, send the following command
   to Listserv@sjuvm.stjohns.edu in the BODY of e-mail:

        SUBSCRIBE AGGRESSION-PSYCHOLOGY yourfirstname yourlastname

        For example: SUBSCRIBE AGGRESSION-PSYCHOLOGY Max Doe

   Owners: Seymour Feshbach  <ekchsyf@mvs.oac.ucla.edu>
           Juan C. Garelli <Lagare@attach.edu.ar>

********************************************************
* Eliana Montuori, MD            *  Juncal 1966        *
* Attachment Research Center     *  1116, Buenos Aires *
* Tel: +54-1 812 5521   Fax: +54-1 812 5432            *
********************************************************

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:5>From rroizen@ix.netcom.com Fri Mar  1 13:02:20 1996

Date: Fri, 1 Mar 1996 11:02:06 -0800
From: rroizen@ix.netcom.com (Ron Roizen )
Subject: Whence a Spencer Spoof?
To: DARWIN-L@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu

I'm having trouble locating a quotation.  Many DARWIN-Lers out there
may recall that Herbert Spencer once defined evolution as "an
integration of matter and a concomitant dissipation of motion; during
which the matter passes from a relatively indefinite, incoherent
homogeneity to a relatively definite, coherent heterogeneity, and
during which the retained motion undergoes a parallel transformation."
William James (if I recall its author correctly) wonderfully and
hilariously spoofed and parodied this definition somewhere.  Anybody
recall James' exact words and where I can lay my hands on the
quotation?  Thanks!  Ron Roizen
--
=================================================================
Ron Roizen
voice:  510-848-9123       1818 Hearst Ave.        dulce est
fax:    510-848-9210       Berkeley, CA 94703      desipere
home:   510-848-9098       U.S.A.                  in loco
rroizen@ix.netcom.com
=================================================================

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:6>From gerson@hooked.net Sat Mar  2 15:07:45 1996

Date: Sat, 2 Mar 1996 13:08:43 -0800
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
From: gerson@hooked.net (Elihu M. Gerson)
Subject: Re: Whence a Spencer Spoof?

>I'm having trouble locating a quotation.  Many DARWIN-Lers out there
>may recall that Herbert Spencer once defined evolution as "an
>integration of matter and a concomitant dissipation of motion; during
>which the matter passes from a relatively indefinite, incoherent
>homogeneity to a relatively definite, coherent heterogeneity, and
>during which the retained motion undergoes a parallel transformation."
>William James (if I recall its author correctly) wonderfully and
>hilariously spoofed and parodied this definition somewhere.  Anybody
>recall James' exact words and where I can lay my hands on the
>quotation?  Thanks!  Ron Roizen

The original Spencer quote is from First Principles (1877), p. 396. The
James parody was:

"Evolution is a change from a no-howish untalkaboutable all-alikeness to a
somehowish and in general talkaboutable not-all-alikeness by continuous
sticktogetherations and somethingelseifications."

It is quoted on p. 482 of Vol. 1 of R. B. Perry's biography,  The Thought
and Character of William James. 2 vols. Boston: Little, Brown. 1935.

Elihu M. Gerson
Tremont Research Institute
458 29 Street
San Francisco, CA 94131
Phone: 415-285-7837   Fax: 415-648-7660  gerson@hooked.net

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:7>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Mon Mar  4 16:19:14 1996

Date: Mon, 04 Mar 1996 17:18:43 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Ligatures, vestiges, and a bibliography of paleography
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

Following up on the topic of ligatures between letters in type (vestiges of
handwritten letter designs) I dug up this working bibliography on paleography
that was posted once to a medieval studies list.  I post it here in case it
may be of interest to some Darwin-L members.

Bob O'Hara (darwin@iris.uncg.edu)

--begin forwarded message--------------

Date: Thu, 25 Nov 1993 00:00:53 -0600
Subject: MEDTEXTL Digest - 23 Nov 1993 to 24 Nov 1993
Sender: Medieval Texts - Philology Codicology and Technology
 <MEDTEXTL@UIUCVMD.BITNET>
To: Recipients of MEDTEXTL digests <MEDTEXTL@VMD.CSO.UIUC.EDU>

Date: Wed, 24 Nov 1993 18:31:41 GMT
From: Avril Henry <A.K.Henry@EXETER.AC.UK>
Subject: Palaeography bib.

Quick and dirty, warts and all--with some holes and the usual
irrelevant shelf-marks--and some once-accented characters caused havoc,
which I simply excised . . . .

Avril
-----------------------------------------------------------------
                          PALAEOGRAPHY
Alexander, J. J. G. "Scribes as Artists: The Arabesque Initial in
    Twelfth-Century English Manuscripts." _Medieval Scribes,
    Manuscripts and Libraries: Essays Presented to N. R. Ker_.
    Ed. M. B. Parkes and Andrew G. Watson. London: Scolar, 1978.
    87-116. *724.567 MED*

Avrin, Leila. _Scribes, Script and Books: The Book Arts from
    Antiquity to the Renaissance_. Chicago: American Library
    Ass'n., 1991. *724.567.AVR/X*

Bieler, L. "Insular Paleography, Present State and Problems."
    _Scriptorium_ 3 (1949): 267-289. *P880.5 S10*

Birch, Walter de Gray. _The History, Art and Palaeography of the
    Manuscript Styled the Utrecht Psalter_. London: Samuel
    Bagster, 1876. 724.567/UTR BIR

Bischoff, Bernhard. _Latin Palaeography: Antiquity and the Middle
    Ages_. Trans. Daibhi O. Cronin and David Ganz. Cambridge:
    Cambridge UP, 1990. Trans. of: _Palaographie des romischen
    Altertums und des abendlandischen Mittelalters_, Berlin:
    Erich Schmidt, 1979. *471.7 BIS_*

Bishop, T. A. M. _English Caroline Minuscule_. Oxford: Clarendon,
    1971. [Excellent photographs and descriptions with
    bibliography.] 421.7. *091.721 BIS/X*

Boyle, Leonard E. _Medieval Latin Palaeography: A Bibliographical
    Introduction_. Toronto Medieval Bibliographies 8. Toronto: U
    of Toronto P, 1984; reprint 1986. *Bibliography 016.4717 BOY*

Brown, Michelle P. _A Guide to Western Historical Scripts from
    Antiquity to 1600_. London: The British Library, 1990.
    *091.72 BRO/X*

Buhler, C. F. _The Fifteenth-Century Book: The Scribes, the
    Printers, the Decorators_. Philadelphia: ............., 1960.
    *NOT IN EUL*

_Calligraphy and Palaeography_. Ed. A. S. Osley. London: Faber &
    Faber, 1965.

Cappelli, A. _Lexicon Abbreviaturarum: Dizionario di abbreviature
    latine ed italiane_. 6th ed. Milan: Hoepli 1961 (and
    reissues). *Old Library ROBOROUGH DICTIONARY 471 CAP*

Cappelli, A. _The Elements of Abbreviation in Medieval Latin
    Paleography_. Trans. David Heimann and Richard Kay.
    University of Kansas Publications, Library Series, 47.
    [Lawrence, KS]: University of Kansas Libraries, 1982. *471.7
    CAP [see Pelzer for supplement]*

Chaytor, A. J. _From Script to Print: An Introduction to Medieval
    Vernacular Literature_. Cambridge: Heffer, 1945. [chapter on
    medieval scribe.] *809 CHA*

Child, H. _The Calligrapher's Handbook_. London: Studio Vista,
    (?) _1985.

Child, H., ed. _Calligraphy Today_. London: Studio Vista, 1976.
    *SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 724.561 CHI/X*

_Codices Latini antiquiores: A Palaeographical Guide to Latin
    Manuscripts to the 9th Century_. Pt 2: _Great Britain and
    Ireland._ Ed. E. A. Lowe. 2nd ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press,
    1972. *Old Library 091.COD/XX_

Dain, Alphone. _Les Manuscrits_. 3rd ed. Paris: Les Belles
    Lettres, 1975. *091.DAI*

Dawson, G. E., and L. Kennedy-Skipton. _Elizabethan Handwriting
    15OO-165O: A Guide to the Reading of Documents and
    Manuscripts_. London: Faber, 1968. [Parallel facsimiles and
    transcriptions]*091.721 DAW*

Diringer, David. _The Alphabet_. 3rd ed. London: Hutchinson,
    1968. [good bibliography and pictures]. *411 DIR*

Doyle, A.I., and M. B. Parkes. "The Production of Copies of the
    _Canterbury Tales_ and the _Confessio Amantis_ in the Early
    Fifteenth Century." _Medieval Scribes, Manuscripts and
    Libraries: Essays Presented to N. R. Ker_. Ed. M. B. Parkes
    and A. G. Watson. London: Scolar Press, 1978. 163-210.
    *724.567 MED*

Drogin, M. _Medieval Calligraphy. Its History and Technique_.
    Montclair, NJ: Allanheld & Schram, 1978. *724.561 DRO.X*

Dumville, David N. "Beowulf Come Lately: Some Notes on the
    Palaeography of the Nowell Codex." _Archiv fur das Studium
    der Neueren Sprachen und Literaturen_ 225.1 (1988): 49-63
    [dating study]

Fairbank, Alfred. _A Book of Scripts_. King Penguin Books, 48.
    London: Penguin, 1949. [Very general (includes calligraphy)
    but readable]*091.72 FAI*

Fairbank, A., and B. Wolpe. _Renaissance Handwriting: An
    Anthology of Italic Scripts_. London: Faber, 196O. *091.721
    FAI/X*

Fairbank, A. J., and R. W. Hunt, _Humanistic Script of the 15th
    and 16th Centuries_. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960.
    [Humanistic Script]*Not in EUL*

Fry, Roger, and E. A. Lowe. _English Handwriting: With Thirty-
    four Facsimile Plates and Palaeographical Criticisms_.
    Tracts/Soc. for Pure English, 23. Oxford: Clarendon Press,
    1926. *420.6 SOC*

Gordon, Joyce S., and Arthur E. Gordon. _Contributions to the
    Palaeography of Latin Inscriptions_. Berkeley: U of
    California P, 1957; Milan: Cisalpino-Goliardica, 1977. *471.7
    GOR*

Grieve, H. E. P. _Examples of English Handwriting 115O-175O: With
    Transcripts and Translations_. Essex Record Office
    Publications, 21. Chelmsford: Essex Education Authority,
    1954. [Examples of cursive hand from parish
    records.]*421.7_*GRI_

Hamel, Christopher de. _Scribes and Illuminators_. Medieval
    Craftsmen. London: British Museum, 1992. *724.567 HAM*

Hector, L. C. _Palaeography and Forgery_. St. Anthony's Hall
    publications 15. London: St. Anthony's Press, 1959. *Pamphlet
    942.74 YOR*

Hector, L. C. _The Handwriting of English Documents_. 2nd edn.
    London: Arnold, 1966. [Handbook to the reading of manuscripts
    plus brief history of handwriting. Good facsimiles with
    transcriptions and bibliography]*421.7 HEC*

H lsmann, Margriet. "Pen Flourishing in _s_.xv Dutch Manuscripts:
    An Analytical Model for Defining Style Variants."*[Not yet
    published but keep trying MLA-CDRom for her name!]*

Huot, Sylvia. "The Scribe as Editor: Rubrication as Critical
    Apparatus in Two Roman de la Rose Manuscripts," _L'Esprit
    Createur_ 27 (1987): 67-78. * P840.5 E35*

Huot, Sylvia. "`Ci parle l'aucteur': Rubrication of Voice and
    Authorship in _Roman de la Rose_ Manuscripts," _Substance_ 56
    (1988): 42-48. * _*Not in EUL: ORDER*

Jed, Stephanie H. "Chastity on the Page: A Feminist Use of
    Palaeography." _Refiguring Woman: Perspectives on Gender and
    the Italian Renaissance_. Ed. Marilyn Migiel and Juliana
    Schiesari. Ithaca: Cornell UP; 1991. 114-30.

Jenkinson, H. _Palaeography and the Practical Study of Court
    Hand_. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1915. *_*_*Alas, not in EUL!
    (Leicester, Kings Coll. London, UCL, Bedford and Royal
    Holloway have it)*

Jenkinson, H. _The Later Court Hands in England from the
    Fifteenth to the Seventeenth Century_. 2 vols. Cambridge:
    Cambridge UP, 1927. *Old Library REFERENCE 421.7 JEN/XX*

Jensen, Hans. _Sign, Symbol and Script_. Trans. George Unwin. 3rd
    ed. London: Allen & Unwin, 1970. *411.JEN*

_John Gower: Recent Readings_. Ed. R. F. Yeager. Kalamazoo:
    Medieval Institute, Western Michigan U., 1989. [_Confessio
    Amantis_, _Canterbury Tales_, Trivet, _Les Chronicles_,
    manuscript study]

John, James J. "Latin Palaeography." _Medieval Studies: An
    Introduction_. Ed. James M. Powell. Syracuse: Syracuse UP;
    1992. 3-81.

Johnson, Charles, and H. Jenkinson. _English Court Hands A.D.
    1066-1500 Illustrated Chiefly from the Public Records_. 2
    vols. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1915. *Old Library
    _*REFERENCE: 421.7 JOH/XX*

Johnston, E. _Writing and Illuminating and Lettering_. *_1946;
    NY: Pitman, 1958. * _[Handbook to the arts.]*Old Library
    s724.561 JOH*

Jones, L. W. "Pricking Manuscripts: The Instruments and Their
    Significance." _Speculum_ 21 (1946): 389-4O3. *P.940.1 S62*

Jones, L. W. _"The Art of Writing at Tours from 1000 to 1200
    A.D." _Speculum_ 15 (1940) [Tours Script]*P.940.1 S62*

Jones, L. W. "The Script of Tours in the Tenth Century,"
    _Speculum_ 14 (1939) [Tours Script]*P.940.1 S62*

_Ker. N. R. _Palaeographical Papers 19O7-1965_. 2 Vols. Oxford:
    Clarendon Press, 1972. [Collection of Lowe's papers on
    palaeography. Heavy.]*Not in EUL*

Kirchner, J. _Scriptura gothica libraria a saeculo XII usque ad
    finem medii aevi LXXXVII imaginibus illustrata_. Munich-
    Vienna: In aedibus Rudolfi Oldenbourg, 1966. *Not in EUL*

Lindsay, Wallace M. _Notae Latinae: An Account of Abbreviation in
    Latin MSS. of the Early Minuscule Period (c.700-850)_. 1915;
    Hildesheim: Olm, 1963. [Abbreviations]*091.72 LIN*

Lowe, E. A. _The Beneventan Script: A History of the South
    Italian Minuscule_. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1914.
    [Beneventan Script]*091.721 LAW*

Lowe, E. A. _English Uncial_. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960)
    [Majuscule]. *Not in EUL*

Lowe, E. A. _Handwriting: Our Medieval Legacy_. Rome: Storia e
    letteratura, 1969. [Superb facsimiles and transcriptions 5th-
    16th C.]*091.721 LOW/X*

Lowe, E. A. _Palaeographical Papers, 1907-1965_. Ed. Ludwig
    Bieler. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972. [On classical
    texts]*091.7 LOW*

_Medieval Scribes, Manuscripts and Libraries: Essays Presented to
    N. R. Ker_. Ed. M. B. Parkes and Andrew G. Watson. London:
    Scolar, 1978. *724.567 MED*

Meiss, M. "Towards a More Comprehensive Renaissance Paleography,"
    _Art Bulletin_ 42 (1960) [Humanistic Script]*P705.A55*

Muir, Bernard James. _The Exeter Book: A Bibliography_. Exeter
    Medieval English Texts and Studies. Exeter: University of
    Exeter Press, 1992. *REFERENCE 829.101 MUI 10*

Muir, Bernard James. _Watching the Exeter Book Scribe Copy Old
    English and Latin texts_. Saint Louis, Mo.: Vatican Film
    Library, Saint Louis University, 1991. Extracted from:
    _Manuscripta_ 35i (March 1991). *PAMPHLET LEA/MUI 10*

Parkes, M. B. _English Cursive Book Hands, 1250-1500_. Oxford
    Palaeographical Handbooks. Rev. ed. Aldershot: Scolar Press,
    1979. * _[Excellent facsimiles dealing with different hands
    of one scribe etc.]*091.721 PAR/X*

Parkes, Malcolm Beckwith. _The Scriptorium of Wearmouth-Jarrow_.
    [Jarrow: Parish of Jarrow, 1983]. *PAMPHLET 942.8 JAR*

Parkes, Malcolm. _Pause and Effect: An Introduction to the
    History of Punctuation in the West_. Aldershot: Scolar Press,
    1993. *411.9 PAR/X*

Parkes, Malcolm. _Scribes, Scripts and Readers: Studies in the
    Communication, Presentation and Dissemination of Medieval
    Texts_. London: Hambledon, 1991. *ON ORDER (18 Oct.1993)*

Pelzer, Auguste. _Abbreviations latines medievales. Supplement au
    Dizionario di abbreviature latine ed italiane, de Adriano
    Cappelli_. Louvain: Publications universitaires; Paris:
    Beatrice-Nauwelaerts, 1964._*870 CAP/PEL*

Pope, John C. "Palaeography and Poetry: Some Solved and Unsolved
    Problems of the Exeter Book." _Medieval Scribes, Manuscripts
    & Libraries: Essays Presented to N. R. Ker_. Ed. M. B. Parkes
    and Andrew G. Watson. London: Scolar Press, 1978. 25-65.
    *724.567 MED*

Preston, Jean F., and Laetitia Yeandle. _English Handwriting
    1400-1650: An Introductory Manual_. Binghamton, N.Y.: Centre
    for Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, 1993. *Not in
    EUL, but worth buying: ISBN 1-85711-003-X*

Rand, E. K. _Studies in the Script of Tours._ 2 vols. Cambridge:
    Cambridge UP, 1929-1934.  [Tours Script]*Not in EUL*

Rumble, Alexander. _The Palaeography of the Domesday
    Manuscripts_. London: Edward Arnold, 1985. [Offprint of
    chapter 3 of _Domesday Book: A Reassessment_, ed. P.H.
    Sawyer]*CATHEDRAL RJ*

_Scott-Fleming, Sonia. _The Analysis of Pen Flourishings in
    Thirteenth-Century Manuscripts_. Litterae textuales. Leiden-
    New York: E.J. Brill, 1989. State University of New York at
    Binghamton. Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance
    Studies. Conference (10th: 1976: Binghampton). *Order*

Skeat, W. W. _Twelve Facsimiles of Old English Manuscripts with
    Transcriptions and an Introduction_. Oxford: Clarendon, 1892.
    *829.08 SKE/X*

_The Calligrapher's Handbook_. Ed. C. M. Lamb, 2d ed. London:
    Faber, 1956. *SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 724.56 LAM*

Thompson, E. M. _An Introduction to Latin and Greek Paleography_.
    Oxford:* _Clarendon Press, 1912. *091.721 THO*

Thompson, E. M. _The History of Handwriting: AD 7OO-14OO_. 19OO.
    [A little florid but interesting and helpful.]*Not in EUL*

Thomson, S. Harrison. _Latin Bookhands of the Later Middle Ages,
    1100-1500_. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1969. *091.721 THO/X*

Thoyts, E. E. _How to Decipher and Study Old Documents_. LOndon:
    Stock, 1893. [Good example of earnest 19th C scholarship.
    Subtitled 'The Key to the Family Deed Chest'!)*091.725 THO*

_*Ullman, B. L. _The Origin and Development of Humanistic
    Script_. Storia e Letteratura, 79. Rome: Edizione di Storia e
    Letteratura, 1960. [Excellent]*091.72 ULL*

Ullman, __B. L. _Ancient Writing and Its Influence_. 1932; 2nd
    ed. Cambridge, Mass.: .........,  1969). *Old Library
    Roborough 091.72 ULL*

University of London Library. _The Palaeography Collection_. 2
    vols. Boston: G. K. Hall & Co., 1968. [Vol.1 Author
    catalogue, Vol. 2 subject catalogue]*Bibliography Section
    016.0917 UNI*

Wardrop, J. _The Script of Humanism_. Oxford: ......., 1963.

Wills, Leonard Johnston. _The Palaeography of the Midlands_. 2nd
    ed. Liverpool: Liverpool UP, 1950. *Old Library 554.25 WIL*

Wills, Leonard Johnston. _A Palaeographical Atlas of the British
    Isles and Adjacent Parts of Europe_. London: Blackie, 1951.
    *912.42 WIL _and*551.70942 WIL/X*

Wright, C. E. _English Vernacular Hands: From the Twelfth to the
    Fifteenth Centuries_. Oxford: 196O. [Good facsimiles and
    descriptions. Helpful and readable] *091.721 WRI/X*

--end forwarded message----------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:8>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Fri Mar  8 17:05:14 1996

Date: Fri, 08 Mar 1996 18:04:52 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: World Congress on Natural History Collections (fwd)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

--begin forwarded message--------------

Date: Fri, 1 Dec 1995 12:18:38 +0000 (GMT)
From: Chris Collins <cjc1001@esc.cam.ac.uk>
Subject: Second World Congress on Natural History Collections (fwd)

                   'Natural History Collections -
                     A Resource for the Future.'

                   "Second World Congress on the
               Preservation and Conservation of Natural
                       History Collections."

                Sponsored by the Biotechnology and
                Biological Sciences Research Council

   Hosted by the Geological Conservation Unit, the Sedgwick Museum and the
   Department of Earth Sciences, University of Cambridge.

   Patrons:     Sir David Attenborough
                Lord Dainton
                Sir Crispin Tickell

   Dates - 20th-24th  August 1996.

Natural History Collections document the range and abundance of species
through time, providing a priceless and irreplaceable record of the
planet's natural heritage.  Recognition of their status as a valuable
and unique resource has increased dramatically in recent years and the
high profile of the Congress is reflected by its patrons (above).  The
Congress intends to develop the challenges inherent in preserving natural
history collections to the year 2000 and beyond and to push forward
philosophies and strategies to meet these challenges.

The first World  Congress in Madrid in 1992 attracted 500 delegates from 70
countries. It was a major success in establishing world-wide
communication and awareness and led to the submission of the
resolutions on the development of Natural History Collections as a world-
wide resource to the  UNCED meeting in Rio de Janeiro.

The major issues that will be discussed at the congress include:

1.      The use and development of collections in industry,research and
        education.
2.      Accessibility of collections using Information technology,databases and
        international data exchange.
3.      Current techniques in the care and management of collections.
4.      Current condition of collections in the developed and developing
        countries.
5.      The media image of natural history collections.
6.      Economic and fund-raising aspects.
7.      Strategies for the future including the practical development of the
        World Council on Collections resources (WCCR).  This body acts as
        an umbrella group with the aim of promoting worldwide:

        a. international co-ordination between groups and institutions;
        b. standards in collection management;
        c. Communication between workers in the field;
        d. the public understanding of the value and importance of these
           collections.

8.      Finally and most importantly, the development of Natural History
        Collections in Developing Countries as a  socio-economic resource.

This will be a practical Congress, providing practical solutions for the
continued development and support of Natural Science Collections around the
world.

Participants from developing countries will be particularly welcomed and
urged to participate in the congress. Every possible assistance will be
given to attract funding to support participants from developing
countries, so that these countries can influence the future practical
initiatives being developed.

The Congress will be structured around discussion sessions and Workshops
involving every participant at the meeting.  These will be lead by a
lecture structure designed to initiate communication and discussion. Poster
sessions relating to the discussion topics will also be run, for which all
participants are invited to submit abstracts for posters.  Information on
poster abstracts will be sent out with the information pack.

If you are interested in receiving more information or would like to
register for the Congress then please return the attached form (with
payment) below to:

        The Administrator - World Congress,
        Department of Earth Sciences,
        University of Cambridge,
        Downing Street,
        Cambridge
        CB2 3EQ.
        UK

        tel:+44 1223 33 34 21
        Fax:+44 1223 33 34 50

[Registration form omitted.  --RJO]

--end forwarded message----------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:9>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Mon Mar 11 11:49:48 1996

Date: Mon, 11 Mar 1996 12:49:25 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Software that models word evolution (fwd)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

This query appeared on HUMANIST (forwarded from LINGUIST); I thought
some Darwin-L subscribers might know (or like to know) the answer.

Bob O'Hara (darwin@iris.uncg.edu)

--begin forwarded message--------------

Date: Mon, 04 Mar 1996 17:58:25 +0100
From: tellier@lifac.ens-cachan.fr
Subject: software for the evolution of words

[From the Linguist List]

Dear linguists,

Friends of mine who do not have access to the net are
wandering if there exists a software to simulate the
evolution of words. For example, entering a latin word
and classical evolution rules, you could obtain the
possible french word(s) derived from it.
Have you ever heard of such tool ?

Thank you for responses,

Isabelle TELLIER
LIFAC, Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan,
61 avenue du President Wilson
94235 CACHAN Cedex France
tel  : (16-1) 47 40 24 28
fax  : (16-1) 47 40 24 64
E-mail: Isabelle.TELLIER@lifac.ens-cachan.fr

--end forwarded message----------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:10>From CRAVENS@macc.wisc.edu Mon Mar 11 13:19:21 1996

Date: Mon, 11 Mar 96 13:01 CDT
From: CRAVENS@macc.wisc.edu
Subject: Re: Software that models word evolution (fwd)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu

I don't know about French, but Lee Hartman has written a very nice
program ("Phono") which will replicate phonological developments
from Latin to Modern Spanish. I *think* I remember Lee saying that
someone with some programming experience wouldn't find it difficult
to adapt Phono to other Romance languages.

Tom Cravens

Dept of French and Italian		cravens@macc.wisc.edu
618 Van Hise Hall			phone: 608-262-6522
University of Wisconsin-Madison	fax: 608-265-3892
Madison, WI 53706

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:11>From mew1@siu.edu Mon Mar 11 22:12:07 1996

Date: Mon, 11 Mar 1996 22:03:07 -0600
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
From: "Margaret E. Winters" <mew1@siu.edu>
Subject: Re: Software that models word evolution (fwd)

I've already sent Lee's name and address to the woman who posted the
question (it appeared on the LINGUIST list).  For anyone else who is
interested, he can be reached at lhartman@siu.edu.  I know he appreciates
queries about his software.

Margaret Winters

Margaret E. Winters
Academic Affairs
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
Carbondale, IL, 62901-4517
Phone:  (618) 549-0106 (Home); (618) 536-5535 (Office)
mew1@siu.edu

At 01:01 PM 3/11/96 CDT, you wrote:
>I don't know about French, but Lee Hartman has written a very nice
>program ("Phono") which will replicate phonological developments
>From Latin to Modern Spanish. I *think* I remember Lee saying that
>someone with some programming experience wouldn't find it difficult
>to adapt Phono to other Romance languages.
>
>Tom Cravens

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:12>From ggale@CCTR.UMKC.EDU Tue Mar 12 09:34:21 1996

Date: Tue, 12 Mar 1996 09:33:59 CST
From: ggale@CCTR.UMKC.EDU
To: DARWIN-L@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Subject: This is a *FORWARD*; respond to original sender, NOT to GGALE

Date: Mon, 11 Mar 1996 19:42:49 -0600
From: Steve Asma x5583 <sxa000@DNS.COLUM.EDU>
Subject: Darwin and Asa Gray
To: Multiple recipients of list HOPOS-L <HOPOS-L@UKCC.uky.edu>

Dear Hopoi,

        I seem to recall that Asa Gray and Darwin had an exchange of
letters about the origin of mutations or variations. Gray, wanting to
synthesize Darwin's theory with theology, suggested that the Deity had
some role in proposing new variations. Darwin, as I only vaguely recall,
upbraided Gray for missing the point about natural selection being a
winnowing process. If God dispatches the "correct" mutations, then there
is no need for the law of natural selection.  Can anyone help me to
pin-point this exchange?

Also, can anyone tell me exactly where the Darwin Archives are? -- and
perhaps a contact person to whom I might write?

Thanks for any help.
--Steve

Dr. Stephen T. Asma
Philosophy
Lib. Ed. Dept.
Columbia College Chicago
(312) 663-1600 x5583
E-mail: steve.asma@mail.colum.edu

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:13>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Tue Mar 12 12:46:43 1996

Date: Tue, 12 Mar 1996 13:46:19 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: March 12 -- Today in the Historical Sciences
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

MARCH 12 -- TODAY IN THE HISTORICAL SCIENCES

1626: JOHN AUBREY is born at Easton Pierse, Wiltshire, England.  Following
study at Trinity College, Oxford, where his interest in antiquities will be
kindled, Aubrey will inherit a considerable fortune from his father, but he
will manage his affairs poorly and live extravagantly, and will be reduced
to poverty within a few years.  His cheerful disposition will win him many
patrons, however, and his continuing and ever expanding interest in British
antiquities will earn him a patent from the Crown giving him the right to make
antiquarian surveys anywhere in Britain.  His careful studies of the ancient
monuments of Stonehenge and Avebury will serve as exemplars for future
antiquarian investigators, and although he will formally publish almost
nothing during his lifetime, he will leave behind a great quantity of
influential manuscript material, including _Monumenta Britannica_, _Remains
of Gentilism and Judaism_, and also the _Essay Towards the Description of
the North Division of Wiltshire_ (1659): "Let us imagine then what kind of
countrie this was in the time of the ancient Britons.  By the nature of the
soil, which is a sour woodsere land, very natural for the production of oakes
especially, one may conclude that this North Division was a shady dismal wood:
and the inhabitants almost as savage as the beasts whose skins were their only
rayment.  The language British, which for the honour of it was in those dayes
spoken from the Orcades to Italie and Spain.  The boats on the Avon (which
signifies River) were basketts of twigges covered with an oxe skin: which the
poore people in Wales use to this day.  They call them _curricles_.  Within
this shire I believe that there were several _Reguli_ which often made war
upon another: and the great ditches which run on in the plaines and elsewhere
so many miles (not unlikely) their boundaries: and withall served for defence
against the incursions of their enemies, as the Pict's wall, Offa's ditch: and
that in China, to compare things small to great.  Their religion is at large
described by Caesar.  Their priests were druids.  Some of their temples
I pretend to have restored, as Avebury, Stonehenge, &c., as also British
sepulchres.  Their waie of fighting is lively sett down by Caesar.  Their
camps with their way of meeting their antagonists I have sett down in another
place.  They knew the use of iron.  They were two or three degrees, I suppose,
less savage than the Americans."

1784: WILLIAM BUCKLAND is born at Axminster in Devonshire, England.  Buckland
will study at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and will eventually become
Oxford's first Professor of Geology, the Dean of Westminster, and twice the
president of the Geological Society of London.  Among his many publications
will be _Reliquiae diluvianae; or, observations on the organic remains
contined in caves, fissures, and diluvial gravel, and on other geological
phenomena, attesting to the action of an universal deluge_ (London, 1823).
Visitors to his Oxford rooms will often remember the scene long after:

            Here see the wrecks of beasts and fishes
            With broken saucers, cups and dishes;
            The prae-Adamic systems jumbled,
            With Sublapsaria brecchia tumbled,
            And post-Noachian bears and flounders,
            With heads of crocodiles and flounders;
            Skins wanting bones, bones wanting skins,
            And various blocks to break your shins...
            The sage amidst the chaos stands
            Contemplative, with laden hands,
            This, grasping tight his bread and butter,
            And that a flint, whilst he doth utter
            Strange sentences that seem to say; --
            'I see it all as clear as day....'

              His eye in a fine frenzy rolling,
            He thus around the fragments strolling,
            Still entertains a fond illusion
            That all the strata's strange confusion
            He shall explain beyond conjecture,
            And clear in the ensuing lecture.

Today in the Historical Sciences is a feature of Darwin-L, an international
network discussion group on the history and theory of the historical sciences.
Send the message INFO DARWIN-L to listserv@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu or connect
to the Darwin-L Web Server (http://rjohara.uncg.edu) for more information.

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:14>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Thu Mar 14 00:07:05 1996

Date: Thu, 14 Mar 1996 01:06:44 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: March 14 -- Today in the Historical Sciences
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

MARCH 14 -- TODAY IN THE HISTORICAL SCIENCES

1793: KARL (KONRAD FRIEDRICH WILHELM) LACHMANN is born at Braunschweig,
Germany.  Lachmann will serve for most of his career as professor of philology
at Friedrich Wilhelm University in Berlin, where he will codify the principles
of modern textual criticism.  From study of the many extant manuscripts of
Lucretius's _De Rerum Natura_, Lachmann will publish in 1850 a reconstruction
of the state of the ancestral manuscript from which they all had been copied,
calculating even the number of pages in the lost ancestor and how many lines
it had on each page.  His work will establish a school of historical text
criticism that will profoundly influence Classical scholarship for the
remainder of the nineteenth century.

Today in the Historical Sciences is a feature of Darwin-L, an international
network discussion group on the history and theory of the historical sciences.
Send the message INFO DARWIN-L to listserv@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu or connect
to the Darwin-L Web Server (http://rjohara.uncg.edu) for more information.

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:15>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Fri Mar 15 15:10:43 1996

Date: Fri, 15 Mar 1996 16:09:16 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Conference on the Linnean hierarchy
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

--begin forwarded message--------------

THE LINNEAN HIERARCHY: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE

12th Annual Southwestern Botanical Systematics Symposium

24-25 May 1996, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Gardens
1500 North College Avenue, Claremont, California 91711

The Linnean taxonomic hierarchy has long served as the backbone of
systematic classification.  The symposium presented by Rancho Santa Ana
Botanic Garden reviews the history of the hierarchy and examines its
attributes.  Presentations will discuss the hierarchy's possible
limitations, including the difficulty in incorporating phylogenetic
information, and consider modifications or alternative systems.  Speakers
include: Kevin de Queiroz, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian
Institution; Kathleen A. Kron, Wake Forest University; Dan H. Nicholson,
National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution; and Tod F.
Stuessy, Natural History Museum, Los Angeles County.

For more information email Ann Joslin (joslina@cgs.edu).

--end forwarded message----------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:16>From lbeltran@servidor.unam.mx Thu Mar 14 14:34:08 1996

Date: Thu, 14 Mar 1996 14:33:59 -0600 (CST)
From: Lopez Beltran Carlos-IIF <lbeltran@servidor.unam.mx>
To: luis javier alvarez <lja@ds5000.dgsca.unam.mx>,
        "Martinez Munoz Sergio F.-IIF" <sfmar@servidor.unam.mx>,
        Benjamin Macias <bm@hp.fciencias.unam.mx>,
        Darwinlist <darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu>,
        HOPOS-List <HOPOS-L@ukcc.uky.edu>
Subject: Simulation & Science Studies - new email list started (fwd)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Thu, 14 Mar 1996 16:47:20 +0000 (GMT)
From: CSSSP CSEC E-List distrib <isb004@cent1.lancs.ac.uk>
To: STS@CCTR.UMKC.EDU, mersenne@mailbase.ac.uk,
    SCIENCE-AS-CULTURE@SJUVM.STJOHNS.EDU
Subject: Simulation & Science Studies - new email list started

  NEW EMAIL LIST ON SCIENCE STUDIES AND COMPUTER SIMULATION

Since the 1950s, various computer simulation techniques have become
increasingly important research tools across a wide range of natural (and
social) sciences. Software packages based on these techniques are also widely
used in more applied fields such as engineering, finance, or environmental
management, often in connection with computerised databases and
electronic data gathering devices.

We are trying to get in touch with other people working in the broad area of
Science Studies / STS / HPS, who are interested in the issues raised by
these modelling techniques, and who would like to join a special interest
email list. Our intention is that by having a relatively narrow focus to the
list, there will be a good chance of having lively debate of interest to most
subscribers.

The list will be useful for:
  - exchange of ideas about computer simulation
  - passing on details of books and articles.
  - announcements of relevant conferences etc.

To join the list, please send email containing only the words:
	subscribe simulist
to the address
	majordomo@lists.lancs.ac.uk
(No subject line necessary)

Please pass on this message to anyone who may be interested.

Thankyou,

Andy Baxter, Centre for Science Studies and Science Policy,
             Lancaster University, U.K. (A.Baxter@lancaster.ac.uk)
Deborah Dowling, Department of History and Philosophy of Science,
             University of Melbourne, Australia
             (deb_dowling.hps@muwaye.unimelb.edu.au)

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:17>From lbeltran@servidor.unam.mx Mon Mar 18 13:38:28 1996

Date: Mon, 18 Mar 1996 13:38:29 -0600 (CST)
From: Lopez Beltran Carlos-IIF <lbeltran@servidor.unam.mx>
To: Darwinlist <darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu>
Subject: Exhibition around Joseph Plateau (fwd)

---------- Forwarded message ----------
Date: Thu, 14 Mar 1996 11:15:39 +0000
From: Maurice F. Dorikens <Maurice.Dorikens@RUG.AC.BE>
To: Multiple recipients of list HOPOS-L <HOPOS-L@UKCC.uky.edu>
Subject: Exhibition around Joseph Plateau

From April 1  till September 30 1996  the Museum for the History of
Sciences of the University of Gent (Belgium) has an exhibition "The
cultural and scientific heritage of Joseph Plateau". It shows
scientific instruments, documents, books etc. from the collections of
the Museum, but also items from private collections, i.e. from the
collections of the descendants of Joseph Plateau. This great
scientist, (1801-1883) who was a professor at the University of Gent,
is best known as the precursor of the animation
film, but he has done considerably more: extensive studies of the
locus, studies about the persistenc of the image on the eye,
develoement of the fantascope and the anorthoscope, experiments about
the behaviour of liquids not subjected to gravity, surface tension in
laminary systems, etc.
The exhibition also concerns Prof. Felix Plateau (1841-1911) a
well-known zoologist and  son of Joseph, and prof. Gustave Van der
Mensbrugghe (1835-1911), theoretical physicist, and son-in-law of
Joseph Plateau.
For the opening of the exhibition, the descendants of the Plateau
family will gather at the museum.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Museum for the History of Sciences
of the University of Gent, Belgium
Science Campus
Krijgslaan 281, building S30
B-9000 Gent, Belgium

Director: Prof.M.Dorikens
tel: +32-9-264.49.30
fax: +32-9-264.49.73
email: Maurice.Dorikens@rug.ac.be

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:18>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Wed Mar 20 12:53:00 1996

Date: Wed, 20 Mar 1996 13:52:38 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Skiamorph/vestige
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

Following up the discussion we were having a little while ago about the
idea of "skiamorph", it would seem to me that one of the most general terms
that captures this notion is "vestige".  Is there a general term in
historical linguistics for linguistic vestiges; silent letters, for example,
that once were pronounced but are no longer, and yet persist in writing
through inheritance?

Some people mentioned the term "exaptation" -- this term was coined by
Gould to refer to the familiar case of a feature that originally served
one purpose being taken over for a second purpose.  This doesn't seem to
me to capture the meaning that the writer of the skiamorph essay was trying
to communicate, however, which was much more the idea of a vestige: a
formerly-functional thing that no longer functions but persists through
inheritance.

I went to look up Darwin's discussion of vestigial organs in the _Origin_,
and my memory had failed me slightly because I saw that he used the term
"rudimentary organs" rather than "vestigial organs" (Origin, chapter 13).
In my dictionary, "rudiment" carries more the connotation of something
beginning to develop, in contrast to "vestige" which comes from the Latin
meaning "footprint" (something left behind; a trace of something from the
past).  It occurred to me that perhaps Darwin was specifically avoiding the
word "vestige" because of its possible association with Chambers' _Vestiges
of the Natural History of Creation_.  Do any of our historians know whether
this might be so?  Has anyone previously commented upon the different
connotations of "rudiment" and "vestige"?

Knowing the etymology of "vestige" also shed light suddenly on another
Victorian work of natural history: Hugh Miller's _Footprints of the Creator_,
which was written as a rejoinder to Chambers' _Vestiges_.  Rather clever
of Miller, no?

Bob O'Hara, Darwin-L list owner

Robert J. O'Hara (darwin@iris.uncg.edu)
Cornelia Strong College, 100 Foust Building
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Greensboro, North Carolina 27412 U.S.A.

_______________________________________________________________________________

<31:19>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Wed Mar 20 13:09:11 1996

Date: Wed, 20 Mar 1996 14:08:53 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Fate of small museums
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

The short item below from the _Chronicle of Higher Education_ on the
renovation of a small college museum recently caught my attention.  Museums
are the institutional foci of many of the historical sciences, and
systematists have been bemoaning the lack of proper support for research
collections in natural history for many years.  Such concern is typically
centered on larger research collections in major universities or public
museums.  Of equal concern, it seems to me, should be museums and
collections in smaller colleges where the primary role of the institution is
teaching.  I remember as an undergraduate how valuable the small teaching
collection at my university was to me.

I would be interested to hear from any Darwin-L members who may be at
smaller colleges: do you have teaching collections (in history, natural
history, archeology, or other fields) that are important?  Are they valued
by your institution?  Are there other success stories like the one below
that ought to be told?  Or are there only horror stories of valuable
hundred-year-old collections being thrown out by ignorant administrators?

Bob O'Hara (darwin@iris.uncg.edu)

--begin quoted article-----------------

ALFRED U. RENEWS A RELIC

(Chronicle of Higher Education, 26 January 1996)

Alfred, N.Y. -- Alfred University will finally reopen its museum after 40
years and a $1.5-million renovation.

The Steinheim Museum, built in 1876, is the second-oldest college museum in
the country, Alfred officials say.  The Gothic building was constructed from
8,000 different types of stone and 700 varieties of wood.  It was designed
by Jonathan Allen, the university's second president.

For many years, the building served as one of the countries few repositories
of natural materials, including fossil and coral collections, bird
specimens, and historical materials, including American Indian relics and
Revolutionary War records.

The building closed in 1950 because of deterioration.  It is to be renamed
for Robert R. McComsey, an Alfred trustee who gave the money for the
renovation.

--end quoted article-------------------

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<31:20>From wmontgom@nasc.mass.edu Thu Mar 21 14:58:18 1996

Date: Thu, 21 Mar 1996 15:59:00 -0500 (EST)
From: William Montgomery <wmontgom@nasc.mass.edu>
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Subject: Re: Skiamorph/vestige

Regarding Bob O'Hara's query about Darwin's use of the term rudimentary
organs (instead of the term vestigial organs), I don't believe he was
trying to avoid reminding his readers of Robert Chambers' "Vestiges of
Creation."  In fact, the term rudimentary organs was simply the accepted
anatomical term of the day for the blind eyes of cave animals or the
human tail bone.  If you aren't an evolutionist, it makes no sense to
refer to these as "vestigial."  The term "rudimentary" had Idealist
philosophical implications in that it suggested that the organs in
question failed to reach ordinary norms of development; however, these
implications were evidently not strong enough to dissuade Darwin from
adopting the customary term.  In a sense, his own usage was "vestigial" in
that it carried with it baggage from the past.
                                 Bill Montgomery
                                 WMontgom@nasc.mass.edu

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<31:21>From kimler@social.chass.ncsu.edu Mon Mar 25 14:18:12 1996

From: "Dr. William C. Kimler, History" <kimler@social.chass.ncsu.edu>
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Date: Mon, 25 Mar 1996 15:17:31 EST
Subject: skEUOmorph?

I'm a little puzzled about the discussion of "skiamorphs."  The
original Bill Atkinson article said that he

>got the word, and the concept behind it, from a book on materials
>science that I long ago mislaid. "Skiamorph" comes from the Greek for
>"shadow" (skia) and "form" (morphe). My long-lost book coined it for
>the unnecessary holdovers that show up when new technologies displace
>existing ones.

But I first encountered the word as "skeuomorph," in George Basalla's
The Evolution of Technology (1988) [ppb., part of the Cambridge
History of Science Series].  In that book, Basalla presented a
cultural evolution model for changes in technology, drawing on
notions of variability, novely, natural selection, continuity and
discontinuity, and -- obviously -- skeuomorphic, historical remnants
of design.  On page 107, he writes that the word came from
archeology [but with no citation -- curse the publisher who doesn't
allow footnotes in paperback textbooks! I haven't been through his
bibliographic essay to see if I can find the source. And curse
newspaper articles that feel it unnecessary to track down sources of
ideas.  Especially if they're not quite right...? ].  The Oxford
English Dictionary has skeuomorph, but no entry for skiamorph.  It
makes a big difference in the etymology -- "skeu-" refers to
"vessel", from the origins of the term to describe remnants of
vessel design elements in later pottery.  [So even the word
skeuomorph is a skeuomorph, if it no longer refers only to pottery.]

As for Darwin's use of "rudiment" for the same idea in morphology,
Bill Montgomery makes a good point when he wrote:
>Regarding Bob O'Hara's query about Darwin's use of the term
>rudimentary organs (instead of the term vestigial organs), I don't
>believe he was trying to avoid reminding his readers of Robert
>Chambers' "Vestiges of Creation."  In fact, the term rudimentary
>organs was simply the accepted anatomical term of the day for the
>blind eyes of cave animals or the human tail bone.  If you aren't an
>evolutionist, it makes no sense to refer to these as "vestigial."

We should always keep in mind the strategy required of Darwin -- to
redefine words from their idealist to their new historical meaning,
rather than simply coining new words.  He wanted not to invent just
an alternative possibility but to take over the domain of the earlier
biology.  Showing that older theoretical issues make more sense under
his view was one of the strongest features of his argument.

Funnily enough, on p. 454 of The Origin (1859 ed.), Darwin uses
another example beyond morphology to make clear what he means about
historical rudiments persisting -- "Rudimentary organs may be
compared with the letters in a word, still retained in the spelling,
but become useless in the pronunciation, but which serve as a clue
in seeking for its derivation."

pedantically,
William

Dr. William Kimler
Department of History - Box 8108
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC 27695-8108
(919) 515-2483
kimler@ncsu.edu

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<31:22>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Mon Mar 25 21:45:16 1996

Date: Mon, 25 Mar 1996 22:44:44 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Software for word evolution continued (fwd from HUMANIST)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

--begin forwarded message--------------

  [1]   From: Russon Wooldridge <wulfric@epas.utoronto.ca>        (27)
        Subject: Re: Software for the evolution of words

Isabelle Tellier (Humanist 9.611) asks about "software to simulate the
evolution of words". I have heard this idea discussed in the context of the
Romance languages, where the laws of historical phonetics could be used to
generate hypothetical vernacular forms derived from Latin and a database of
attested forms would show the degree of conformity of the actual to the
virtual (e.g. Lat. *tabula* > It. *tavola*, Fr. *table*, Sp. *tabla*). This
could be a wonderful pedagogical tool which I hope someone -- or a team of
someones, perhaps I. Tellier and her friends -- is working or will work on.

In the meantime, the program Graphist (runs on a PC) is apparently (I have
never received a promised beta version) able to generate Modern French forms
from Renaissance and Classical ones. It was developed to help with the RENA
(Robert Estienne - Nicot - Academie) project on the history of French
orthography. The RENA project has been undertaken -- its main product, a
*Dictionnaire historique de l'orthographe francaise*, was published by
Larousse in 1994 -- at CNRS-HESO, 27 r. Paul Bert, 94200 Ivry-sur-Seine,
tel. 1.49.60.40.12, fax 1.49.60.40.80. The author of Graphist is Laurent
Catach (as of December 1994 at 10 r. Jouye-Rouve, 75020 Paris, tel.
1.46.36.39.64). An article describing Graphist can be found in CCH Working
Papers, vol. 4; it should be reappearing soon in electronic form (for
details of CCHWP see TCHWP at http://www.utoronto.ca:8080/tchwp/).

I hope this information is useful.

Russon Wooldridge
------------
Russon Wooldridge, Department of French, Trinity College,
University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 1H8, Canada
Tel: 1-416-978-2885 -- Fax: 1-416-978-4949
E-mail: wulfric@epas.utoronto.ca
Internet: http://www.epas.utoronto.ca:8080/~wulfric/

--end forwarded message----------------

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Darwin-L Message Log 31: 1-22 -- March 1996                                 End

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