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Darwin-L Message Log 42: 1–22 — February 1997

Academic Discussion on the History and Theory of the Historical Sciences

Darwin-L was an international discussion group on the history and theory of the historical sciences, active from 1993–1997. Darwin-L was established to promote the reintegration of a range of fields all of which are concerned with reconstructing the past from evidence in the present, and to encourage communication among scholars, scientists, and researchers in these fields. The group had more than 600 members from 35 countries, and produced a consistently high level of discussion over its several years of operation. Darwin-L was not restricted to evolutionary biology nor to the work of Charles Darwin, but instead addressed the entire range of historical sciences from an explicitly comparative perspective, including evolutionary biology, historical linguistics, textual transmission and stemmatics, historical geology, systematics and phylogeny, archeology, paleontology, cosmology, historical geography, historical anthropology, and related “palaetiological” fields.

This log contains public messages posted to the Darwin-L discussion group during February 1997. It has been lightly edited for format: message numbers have been added for ease of reference, message headers have been trimmed, some irregular lines have been reformatted, and error messages and personal messages accidentally posted to the group as a whole have been deleted. No genuine editorial changes have been made to the content of any of the posts. This log is provided for personal reference and research purposes only, and none of the material contained herein should be published or quoted without the permission of the original poster.

The master copy of this log is maintained in the Darwin-L Archives (rjohara.net/darwin) by Dr. Robert J. O’Hara. The Darwin-L Archives also contain additional information about the Darwin-L discussion group, the complete Today in the Historical Sciences calendar for every month of the year, a collection of recommended readings on the historical sciences, and an account of William Whewell’s concept of “palaetiology.”


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DARWIN-L MESSAGE LOG 42: 1-22 -- FEBRUARY 1997
----------------------------------------------

DARWIN-L
A Network Discussion Group on the
History and Theory of the Historical Sciences

Darwin-L@raven.cc.ukans.edu is an international network discussion group on
the history and theory of the historical sciences.  Darwin-L was established
in September 1993 to promote the reintegration of a range of fields all of
which are concerned with reconstructing the past from evidence in the present,
and to encourage communication among academic professionals in these fields.
Darwin-L is not restricted to evolutionary biology nor to the work of Charles
Darwin but instead addresses the entire range of historical sciences from an
interdisciplinary perspective, including evolutionary biology, historical
linguistics, textual transmission and stemmatics, historical geology,
systematics and phylogeny, archeology, paleontology, cosmology, historical
anthropology, historical geography, and related "palaetiological" fields.

This log contains the public messages posted to Darwin-L during February 1997.
It has been lightly edited for format: message numbers have been added for ease
of reference, message headers have been trimmed, some irregular lines have been
reformatted, and some administrative messages and personal messages posted to
the group as a whole have been deleted.  No genuine editorial changes have been
made to the content of any of the posts.  This log is provided for personal
reference and research purposes only, and none of the material contained herein
should be published or quoted without the permission of the original poster.
The master copy of this log is maintained on the Darwin-L Web Server at
http://rjohara.uncg.edu.  For instructions on how to retrieve copies of this
and other log files, and for additional information about Darwin-L and the
historical sciences, connect to the Darwin-L Web Server or send the e-mail
message INFO DARWIN-L to listserv@raven.cc.ukans.edu.

Darwin-L is administered by Robert J. O'Hara (darwin@iris.uncg.edu), Center for
Critical Inquiry in the Liberal Arts and Department of Biology, University of
North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, North Carolina 27412 U.S.A., and it
is supported by the Center for Critical Inquiry, University of North Carolina
at Greensboro, and the Department of History and the Academic Computing Center,
University of Kansas.

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:1>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Sat Feb  1 00:05:07 1997

Date: Sat, 01 Feb 1997 01:05:01 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: List owner's monthly greeting
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

Greetings to all Darwin-L subscribers.  On the first of every month I send
out a short note on the status of our group, along with a reminder of basic
commands.  For additional information about the group please visit the
Darwin-L Web Server <http://rjohara.uncg.edu>.

Darwin-L is an international discussion group for professionals in the
historical sciences.  The group is not devoted to any particular discipline,
such as evolutionary biology, but rather seeks to promote interdisciplinary
comparisons across the entire range of fields concerned with historical
reconstruction, including evolution, historical linguistics, archeology,
geology, cosmology, historical geography, textual transmission, and history
proper.  Darwin-L is not an amateur chat forum, nor a forum for discussion
of creationism and evolution.  Darwin-L currently has about 700 members from
more than 35 countries.

Because Darwin-L does have a large membership and is sometimes a high-volume
discussion group it is important for all participants to try to keep their
postings as substantive as possible so that we can maintain a favorable
"signal-to-noise" ratio.  Because Darwin-L is not a chat-oriented group,
personal messages should be sent by private e-mail rather than to the group
as a whole.  The list owner does lightly moderate the group in order to
filter out error messages, commercial advertising, and occasional off-topic
postings. Subscribers who feel burdened from time to time by the volume of
their Darwin-L mail may wish to take advantage of the "digest" option
described below.

Because different mail systems work differently, not all subscribers see
the e-mail address of the original sender of each message in the message
header (some people only see "Darwin-L" as the source).  It is therefore
very important to include your name and e-mail address at the end of every
message you post so that everyone can identify you and reply privately if
appropriate.  Remember also that in most cases when you type "reply" in
response to a message from Darwin-L your reply is sent to the group as a
whole, rather than to the original sender.

The following are the most frequently used listserv commands that Darwin-L
members may wish to know.  All of these commands should be sent as regular
e-mail messages to the listserv address (listserv@raven.cc.ukans.edu),
not to the address of the group as a whole (Darwin-L@raven.cc.ukans.edu).
In each case leave the subject line of the message blank and include no
extraneous text, as the command will be read and processed by the listserv
program rather than by a person.  To join the group send the message:

     SUBSCRIBE DARWIN-L Your Name

     For example: SUBSCRIBE DARWIN-L John Smith

To cancel your subscription send the message:

     UNSUBSCRIBE DARWIN-L

If you feel burdened by the volume of mail you receive from Darwin-L you
may instruct the listserv program to deliver mail to you in digest format
(one message per day consisting of the whole day's posts bundled together).
To receive your mail in digest format send the message:

     SET DARWIN-L MAIL DIGEST

To change your subscription from digest format back to one-at-a-time
delivery send the message:

     SET DARWIN-L MAIL ACK

To temporarily suspend mail delivery (when you go on vacation, for example)
send the message:

     SET DARWIN-L MAIL POSTPONE

To resume regular delivery send either the DIGEST or ACK messages above.

For a comprehensive introduction to Darwin-L with notes on our scope and
on network etiquette, and a summary of all available commands, send the
message:

     INFO DARWIN-L

To post a public message to the group as a whole simply send it as regular
e-mail to the group's address (Darwin-L@raven.cc.ukans.edu).

I thank you all for your continuing interest in Darwin-L and in the
interdisciplinary study of the historical sciences.

Bob O'Hara, Darwin-L list owner

Dr. Robert J. O'Hara (darwin@iris.uncg.edu)  |  Darwin-L Server
Cornelia Strong College, 100 Foust Building  |   http://rjohara.uncg.edu
University of North Carolina at Greensboro   |  Strong College Server
Greensboro, North Carolina 27412 U.S.A.      |   http://strong.uncg.edu

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:2>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Tue Feb  4 13:26:04 1997

Date: Tue, 04 Feb 1997 14:15:17 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Delay
To: darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

The list owner apologizes for the long delay in Darwin-L messages.  Much as
I would like to say I was on vacation in the Bahamas for a couple weeks, in
fact I've been out with a very bad case of influenza and assorted other
complications.  The microbial world just suddenly took a liking
to me I guess.  It may be a few days before normal broadcasting resumes.
In the mean time please enjoy this Darwin-L break, our first in three years.

Bob O'Hara (darwin@iris.uncg.edu)
Darwin-L list owner

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:3>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Sun Feb 23 20:04:56 1997

Date: Sun, 23 Feb 1997 21:04:45 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Normal operations will resume shortly (from the list owner)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

The list owner has returned from an extended absence.  Much as I would like
to say I was vacationing in the Bahamas, I was in fact under the weather
right here in North Carolina and even spent a week in the local hospital.
I'm gradually working my way back up to speed and have begin to go through
the backlog of Darwin-L material that came in while I was out.  It will take
a few days for me to process it all, so please be patient.  Our regular
discussions of the historical sciences will resume shortly.

Bob O'Hara, Darwin-L list owner

Robert J. O'Hara (darwin@iris.uncg.edu)      |
Cornelia Strong College, 100 Foust Building  |  http://rjohara.uncg.edu
University of North Carolina at Greensboro   |  http://strong.uncg.edu
Greensboro, North Carolina 27412 U.S.A.      |

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:4>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Sun Feb 23 20:31:44 1997

Date: Sun, 23 Feb 1997 21:31:37 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Confrerence: History of the Human Sciences (fwd)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

--begin forwarded message--------------

Date: Mon, 20 Jan 1997 23:22:28 -0600 (MDT)
From: "Ross B. Emmett" <emmer@Corelli.Augustana.AB.CA>
Subject: CONFANN -- History of the Human Sciences
To: CIRLA-L@vivaldi.Augustana.AB.CA

Announcing a conference celebrating the tenth anniversary of the
publication of the journal

History of the Human Sciences

Who Speaks? The Voice in the Human Sciences

to be held at Burwalls Conference Centre,
University of Bristol
21st-23rd March, 1997

Supported by the University of Bristol,
The University of the West of England,
and the University of Birmingham
University of Durham
Alumni Foundation (Bristol University)

The conference theme has been developed from a special issue of the journal
`History of the Human Sciences' to be published in 1997. The focus of
discussion will be on the procedures by which utterances, generally written
texts (though the notion will be extended to visual  presentations as well)
are deployed, expressed and put to use in the disciplinary field which
constitutes the human sciences. The conference is expected to display how
such texts are organised and ultimately how the narrative voice of the
scholar and researcher emerges and articulates its claims. Among the themes
will be disciplinary voices, gendered voices and silent voices.

The conference like the journal special issue will draw on a broad range of
scholarship which may be considered representative of work in the human
sciences.  In particular there will be contributions from within humanistic
studies such as English literature, literary theory, classical studies,
standard social sciences like sociology and anthropology, as well as the
broad and encompassing domain of history with its cross-cutting and
overlapping investigations into art and aesthetics, philosophy and the
social studies of science, amongst many others.

The conference will be held in a handsome Victorian mansion with extensive
grounds and good modern facilities near the famous Suspension Bridge in
Bristol.

Organising Committee:

Steve Buckler (Birmingham), Sean Hand (London Guildhall), Paul Hoggett
(UWE), Charles Martindale (Bristol), George Myerson (King's College
London), Thomas Osborne (Bristol), Helen Small (Pembroke, Oxford),
Irving Velody (HHS/UWE).

Director:
Professor Paul Hoggett (CESER), University of the West England

Amongst the participants will be:-
David Adams (Ohio State), Stephen Bann (Kent), Gillian Beer (Clare Hall,
Cambridge), Harriet Bradley (Bristol), Steve Buckler (Birmingham), Sean
Burke (Durham),  Terrell Carver (Bristol), David Chaney (Durham), Stephen
Connor (Birbeck), Kenneth Gergen  (Swarthmore), Sean Hand (London
Guildhall), Chris Johnson (Keele),  Duncan Kennedy (Bristol), Bruce
Krajewski (Laurentian, Canada), Peter Lassman (Birmingham), George Marcus
(Rice University, Texas), George Myerson (King's College London), Thomas
Osborne (Bristol), David Owen (Southampton), Dick Pels (Amsterdam), Liz
Prettejohn (Courtauld Institute), Richard Roberts (Lancaster), Nikolas Rose
(Goldsmiths College London), John Shotter (New Hampshire), Helen Small
(Pembroke, Oxford), Roger Smith (Lancaster), Judith Squires (Bristol),
Judith Still (Nottingham),  Nigel Thrift (Bristol), Charles Turner
(Warwick), Graham Ward (Peterhouse, Cambridge), Sean Watson (UWE), Pat Waugh
(Durham), Robin Williams (Durham), Vanda Zajko (Bristol).

For further details please write to:-
Lesley Gander
Faculty of Economics and Social Science
University of the West of England
Coldharbour Lane
Bristol BS16 1QY
England

Tel: 0117-965-6261
Fax: 0117-976-3870
Email: L-Gander@wpg.uwe.ac.uk.

--end forwarded message----------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:5>From lamb@vt.edu Mon Jan 27 08:48:27 1997

Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 09:48:20 -0500 (EST)
To: hopos-l@lsv.uky.edu, STS@cctr.umkc.edu, CADUCEUS-L@Beach.UTMB.Edu,
        Darwin-L@raven.cc.ukans.edu, HTECH-L@SIVM.SI.EDU
From: Ed Lamb <lamb@vt.edu>
Subject: Call for Articles

Hello All,
        I am sending this call for articles to a few other lists.  I
apologize for any cross-postings.

        I am currently soliciting articles for the next, and future, issues
of the journal PERSPECTIVES ON SCIENCE:  HISTORICAL, PHILOSOPHICAL, SOCIAL
The journal publishes studies of science (and medicine and technology) that
integrate historical, philosophical, and/or sociological understandings of
the topic(s) being addressed.  The editors of PERSPECTIVES  believe that
publishing interdisciplinary studies of specific people and events in
science will help scholars gain a more comprehensive understanding of
science in general.

        The journal has been published for five years by the University of
Chicago Press.  Each issue of PERSPECTIVES includes case studies,
theoretical articles, and historiographic essays.  Past articles include:

"The Resolution of Discordant Results," Allan Franklin

"Rationality Among the Friends of Truth:  The Gassendi-Descartes
Controversy," Lynn S. Joy

"Towards More Secrecy in Science?  Challenges to an Ethics of Science,"
Mathias Kaiser

"Cordelia's Love:  Credibility, Validity, and the Social Studies of
Science," Steven Shapin

"Looting, Reparation, and Stewardship:  Ethical Issues in Archaeology,"
Alison Wylie

"The Political Cartography of the Human Genome Project," Brian Balmer.

        Upcoming issues include selcted proceedings of the first annual
meeting for the History of Philosophy of Science and overviews of current
themes in the philosophy of biology and a historiographic essay on books
about the Internet.

        For more information on the journal in general, or about submitting
articles specifically, please visit the journal's homepage at

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/POS/home.html

Feel free to contact me at the address below if you have any questions.

Ed Lamb
Managing Editor
Perspectives on Science
Department of Philosophy
Virginia Tech
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0126

Ph. (540) 231-7879
Fax (540) 231-6367
Email lamb@vt.edu
         pos@vt.edu

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:6>From dawnvo@unixg.ubc.ca Mon Jan 27 18:37:08 1997

Date: Mon, 27 Jan 1997 16:37:03 -0800 (PST)
From: dawnvo@unixg.ubc.ca
To: darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu
Subject: Second Call for Abstracts--Grad Student Conference

SECOND CALL FOR ABSTRACTS--PLEASE POST AND CIRCULATE--SECOND CALL

University of British Columbia

Graduate Student Conference on Evolutionary Perspectives in the Social
Sciences and Humanities

October 3-5, 1997
University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, B.C., Canada

DEADLINES
February 28: deadline for abstracts
May 30:      (or before) notification of acceptance

The purpose of this conference is to bring together graduate students from
a variety of disciplines working on issues related to evolution.  Graduate
students and interested faculty will find out the sorts of evolutionary
issues people in other disciplines are working on, and how they view
evolutionary issues and deal with puzzles raised by the use of
evolutionary models in non-biological contexts.

We envision a conference which will be of interest to a wide range of
disciplines, with papers which are accessible to an interdisciplinary
audience.  This conference may be of interest to people working in the
theoretical sciences, applied science, economics, commerce, anthropology,
psychology, philosophy, history, cultural studies, science studies,
religious studies, sociology, applied mathematics, computing science,
linguistics, English literature and others.

Keynote Speaker:  	Dr. David Hull (Northwestern), author of _Science
			as a Process_

Invited Speaker:  	Dr. Peter Danielson (UBC), editor of _Modelling
			Rationality, Morality and Evolution_

Possible topics (but not limited to these):

-historical attitudes in the humanities about Darwinian evolution
-evolutionary models of culture/cultural speciation
-new perspectives in sociobiology
-evolutionary psychology
-evolutionary models in science studies
-articles questioning the usefulness/viability of evolutionary models in
the social sciences and the humanities
-historical case studies of ways that evolutionary thinking has entered
into one or more humanistic and social scientific disciplines
-how changes in evolutionary theory have been reflected in social theory,
social policy, models of cultural change, etc.
-new historical viewpoints about social darwinism
-evolutionary linguistics
-"invisible hand" explanations in economics

We are open to any topic accessible to an interdisciplinary audience and
which relates theories of evolution in some way to the social sciences or
humanities.  If you're not sure whether your idea would be applicable,
send us a short note and we can tell you whether it would be worth writing
up the abstract and article summary.

Format of submissions:  Please submit (preferably by email) an abstract of
200-250 words, and a 3 page summary (roughly 750 words) of your proposed
paper.  Include your name, your institutional and departmental
affiliation, email address (or snail mail address if you don't have
email), and tentative paper title.  Plan a presentation or paper reading
of 20-30 minutes.  Proposals for panel discussions are also welcome.

Out-of-town graduate students are encouraged to secure their own funding,
but some travel funding may become available.  We will attempt to billet
as many people as possible on a first-come-first-served basis.

For anyone interested in acting as a referee, please contact us with a
short note about your research area.

This Conference is being sponsored by the UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies, UBC
Philosophy and Zoology Departments, and Green College.

Submit abstracts and article summaries either to dawnvo@unixg.ubc.ca or
chrismac@ethics.ubc.ca

Conference Web-Page:
http://www.ethics.ubc.ca/~chrismac/evol/

Dawn Ogden	Chris MacDonald
Conference Co-Chairs

Phone:  604-822-3292
Fax:    604-822-4978
UBC Philosophy Department
1866 Main Mall, Buch E-370
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1Z1  Canada

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:7>From straker@unixg.ubc.ca Thu Feb 20 15:54:20 1997

Date: Thu, 20 Feb 1997 13:54:06 -0800 (PST)
From: Stephen Straker <straker@unixg.ubc.ca>
To: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Cc: darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu
Subject: Position in Environmental History / Historical Geography

The following position at UBC has just been advertised.
Please spread the word (with apologies for multiple posts).

Thanks,

Stephen Straker             straker@unixg.ubc.ca
Arts One // History         (604) 822-6863
University of British Columbia  / FAX: (604) 822-4520
Vancouver, Canada  V6T 1Z1

                *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

       *ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY / HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY*

Applications are invited for a joint (equally shared) tenure
stream appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor in the
Departments of Geography and History at the University of British
Columbia.  The search is for an outstanding scholar in American
(preferably western American) environmental history / historical
geography who is well-grounded in the sciences and the
humanities.  Research and teaching interests must be compatible
with those of both departments and preferred applicants will be
those with: developed interests in the social dimensions of
environmental change and the social construction of nature; and
research that centres upon renewable resources, preferably
forestry.  Teaching responsibilities include undergraduate
courses in both departments and in two or more of the following
areas: American environmental history, Forest History, Natural
resource or environmental geography, and Humanistic perspectives
on the environment.

Applicants are expected to have a Ph.D., teaching experience and
significant publications.

Inquiries or applications, including a curriculum vitae and the
names, addresses and telephone numbers of three referees should
be sent to either:

Dr. David Breen                    Dr. Trevor Barnes
Department of History              Department of Geography
University of British Columbia     University of British Columbia
#1297 - 1873 East Mall             1984 West Mall
Vancouver, British Columbia        Vancouver, British Columbia
V6T 1Z1                            V6T 1Z2
FAX: (604) 822-6658                FAX: (604) 822-6150

The closing date for applications is 24 March 1997 and the
starting date for this position is 1 July 1997.
This position is subject to final budgetary approval.

Web pages -- http://www.arts.ubc.ca./history/history.htm
             http://www.geog.ubc.ca./

The University of British Columbia welcomes all qualified
applicants, especially women, aboriginal people, visible
minorities and persons with disabilities.  In accordance with
Canada's immigration requirements, priority will be given to
Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada.

              *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:8>From dawnvo@unixg.ubc.ca Mon Feb 24 00:50:27 1997

From: <dawnvo@unixg.ubc.ca>
Date: Sun, 23 Feb 1997 22:50:20 -0800 (PST)
To: darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu
Subject: Re: Second Call for Abstracts--Grad Student Conference

Hello All,

The second call for abstracts and summaries was to have come out in
January, but Darwin-L has been down.  So if anyone is just seeing the call
for the first time but wants to submit, and thinks they'll have trouble
making the deadline, please contact us.  Thanks.

Dawn Ogden, Conference Co-Chair
Evolutionary Perspectives in the Social Sciences and Humanities
dawnvo@netinfo1.ubc.ca    msgs. 604-822-3292    fax 604-822-8782
http://www.ethics.ubc.ca/~chrismac/evol/

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:9>From JHOFMANN@ccvax.fullerton.edu Sat Feb  8 14:32:16 1997

Date: Sat, 08 Feb 1997 12:30:38 -0800 (PST)
From: JHOFMANN@ccvax.fullerton.edu
Subject: Phyogenetic Tree CD ROM
To: darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu

Greetings:
	Can anyone recommend a good CD ROM on Phylogenetic relationships
and related information?
Thanks in advance.
Jim Hofmann
Cal State Fullerton
jhofmann@fullerton.edu

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:10>From JHOFMANN@ccvax.fullerton.edu Sun Feb  9 20:35:22 1997

Date: Sun, 09 Feb 1997 18:34:28 -0800 (PST)
From: JHOFMANN@ccvax.fullerton.edu
Subject: Garlic, Onions and Lilies
To: darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu

Greetings:
	In _The Disorder of Things_, John Dupre claims that the usual English
term "Lily" refers to species between which there is no "scientific"
distinction, such as garlic and onion. He notes quite rightly, I think, that
sending a Valentine greeting of onions would generate a different response
than a gift of elongated white flowers typically called "lilies". But he also
claims that there is no scientificically based distinction between garlic,
onions and lilies. [See pages 28 &34 for example]. I find this hard to
believe and I would appreciate some expert comment prior to my decision
on a Valentine's day gift.
Jim Hofmann
Cal State Fullerton
jhofmann@fullerton.edu

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:11>From mayerg@cs.uwp.edu Tue Feb 25 09:21:30 1997

Date: Tue, 25 Feb 1997 09:21:09 -0600 (CST)
From: Gregory Mayer <mayerg@cs.uwp.edu>
Subject: Re: Garlic, Onions and Lilies
To: darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu

Onion and garlic are different species in the same genus (_Allium_).
True lilies comprise a number of species in the genus _Lilium_, and there
are other things called lilies in other genera.  Onions, garlics, and
lilies are all usually put in the family Liliaceae.

It's difficult to imagine how someone could say there are no "scientific"
differences among these, even with the most unorthodox construal of the
meaning of "scientific differences".

Gregory C. Mayer
mayerg@cs.uwp.edu

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:12>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Tue Feb 25 20:11:33 1997

Date: Tue, 25 Feb 1997 21:01:15 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Charles Darwin CD-ROM (fwd)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

--begin forwarded message--------------

Date: Mon, 03 Feb 1997 11:00:07 -0800
From: Pete Goldie <pg@lbin.com>
Subject: Darwin CD-ROM, 2nd Edition
To: darwin@iris.uncg.edu

Dear Dr. O'Hara,

We have recently released the "Darwin Multimedia CD-ROM, 2nd Edition".  Our
early reviews back so far have been very positive.  You can see a sampling
of the contents ou our web page, listed below.

I would like to circulate a note on the Darwin-L list, however, first this
would require checking on your tolerance for a commercial notice.

Best regards,

Pete

****************************
* Pete Goldie, Ph.D.       *
* President                *
* Lightbinders, Inc.       ******
* 2325 Third Street - Suite 324 *
* San Francisco, CA  94107      *
*********************************************
* Internet: pg@lbin.com   http://lbin.com   *
*********************************************
* Voice: 415-621-5746    Fax: 415-621-5898  *
*********************************************

*** NEW! DARWIN Multimedia CD-ROM
- The Collective Works of Charles Darwin on CD-ROM (2nd Edition):
http://lbin.com/darwin/

--end forwarded message----------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:13>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Tue Feb 25 20:19:02 1997

Date: Tue, 25 Feb 1997 21:11:24 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Field school in historical anthropology (fwd)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

--begin forwarded message--------------

Date: Mon, 03 Feb 1997 17:36:46 -0600 (MDT)
From: Sam Couch <SCOUCH@dsu1.dsu.NoDak.edu>
Subject: Wilderness Field School
To: darwin@iris.uncg.edu
Organization: Dickinson State University

If appropriate, please list the following notice on Darwin-L.  Thanks!

Dickinson State University, in cooperation with the US Forest Service, plans
to conduct a wilderness anthropological field school in Idaho's Payette
National Forest from June 29 to July 18, 1997.  The project will involve site
testing and evaluation of a 19th-century Chinese mining encampment.  For
more information, contact Dr. Sam. Couch, Dept. of Social Sciences,
Dickinson State University, Dickinson, ND  58601, or visit the field school
website at: "http://www.dsu.nodak.edu/~scouch/field_school/fs.html"

Cheers!

Samuel L. Couch, Assistant Professor of Geography and Anthropology
Department of Social Sciences, Dickinson (ND) State University 58601
701-227-2114 ofc; 800-279-4295 DSU toll free;
701-227-2006 fax; 701-225-2338 res

--end forwarded message----------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:14>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Wed Feb 26 10:29:11 1997

Date: Wed, 26 Feb 1997 11:28:59 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Re: Phylogenetic Tree CD ROM (fwd)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

--begin forwarded message--------------

Date: Tue, 25 Feb 1997 09:55:11 -0500 (EST)
From: Kevin de Queiroz <MNHVZ082%SIVM.BITNET@KUHUB.CC.UKANS.EDU>
Subject: Re: Phylogenetic Tree CD ROM
To: Darwin-L <darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Concerning Jim Hofmann's request about CD ROMs on phylogenetic
relationships, the California Academy of Sciences put one together
called Lifemap as part of their Life Through Time exhibit.  I
believe it is still available.  If you are willing to go to the
WWW, there is, of course, the Tree of Life (http://phylogeny.
arizona.edu/tree/).

Kevin de Queiroz

--end forwarded message----------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:15>From Izzy@telaviv.ndsoft.com Wed Feb 26 23:13:05 1997

From: "Izzy (Israel) Cohen" <Izzy@telaviv.ndsoft.com>
To: "'DARWIN List'" <DARWIN-L@RAVEN.CC.UKANS.EDU>
Subject: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Date: Thu, 27 Feb 97 07:11:00 PST

Forwarded by: Israel Cohen <izzy@telaviv.ndsoft.com>
Subject: Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
Date: Tuesday, 25 February 1997 02:58PM
From: james <jrenfro@seas.upenn.edu>

Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution

http://www.apnet.com/www/journal/fy.htm

This online version of the print journal of the same name is published
bimonthly by Academic Press, Inc. through a program titled IDEAL
(International Digital Electronic Access Library). Molecular Phylogenetics
and Evolution is dedicated to bringing Darwin's dream=97to "have fairly
true genealogical trees of each great kingdom of Nature"=97within grasp.
The journal provides a forum for molecular studies that advance our
understanding of phylogeny and evolution. This journal plays an important
role by publishing the results of molecular studies that identify the
actual clades to which different species and higher taxa belong. Such
knowledge will further the development of phylogenetically more accurate
taxonomic classifications and ultimately lead to a unified classification
for all the ramifying lines of life. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution
publishes high-quality papers that result from or encourage the
collaboration of molecular biologists and computer scientists with the
community of systematic and evolutionary biologists. In addition, the
journal presents new findings on or insights into evolutionary processes
and mechanisms as expressed at the molecular level, as well as papers that
deal with the methodology of reconstructing evolutionary history from
molecular data (such as papers that describe new or more powerful computer
algorithms for constructing phylogenetic trees from homologous nucleotide
sequences or from homologous amino acid sequences).=20

Some articles appearing in the February 1997 issue of the Journal include:
'Phylogenetic Analysis of North American Rhagoletis (Diptera: Tephritidae)
and Related Genera Using Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Data', 'Molecular
Phylogenetic Study of Tephritidae (Insecta: Diptera) Using Partial
Sequences of the Mitochondrial 16S Ribosomal DNA', and 'Phylogeny of
Cephalopods Inferred from Mitochondrial DNA Sequences'.

Subscription to this electronic journal involves licensing agreements with
academic and industrial networks or consortia of libraries and can not be
done on a personal or even title by title basis. However, the table of
contents and article abstracts for each issue are available online
free-of-charge. Articles are provided to members of subscriber
institutions in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format.

ISSN 1055-7903=20

Editor-in-Chief: Morris Goodman
Email: apsubs@acad.com

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:16>From ahouse@hydra.rose.brandeis.edu Thu Feb 27 00:52:14 1997

Date: Thu, 27 Feb 1997 01:49:56 -0500
To: darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu (Darwin List)
From: "Jeremy C. Ahouse" <ahouse@hydra.rose.brandeis.edu>
Subject: summer programs for undergrads

DarwinL,

	Do any of you know of summer interneships for undergraduates
interested in evolutionary biology, paleontology, and allied fields? I have
had a number of questions from students.

	Thank you,

	Jeremy

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:17>From ebostick@KSUMail.Kennesaw.Edu Thu Feb 27 10:24:04 1997

Date: Thu, 27 Feb 1997 11:22:30 -0500 (EST)
To: Darwin-L@raven.cc.ukans.edu
From: "ED BOSTICK (BIOLOGY FACULTY)" <ebostick@KSUMail.Kennesaw.Edu>
Subject: Intro of new subscriber

Greetings.

I am a biology prof at Kennesaw State University in Georgia. Currently teach
GenBiol, EarthSci, Plant Systematics, NatHist of Ga, and several others.
Research on forest disturbance ecology., biology and folk history of Kudzu.

Have become interested in the well-known and oft-cited parallels between
biological and linguistic evolution. Would like to learn more about the
linguistic equivalents of biological "mutation" and "selection". In other
words, what causes linguistic change and then what causes these changes to
become established in a population?

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:18>From DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu Thu Feb 27 10:53:51 1997

Date: Thu, 27 Feb 1997 11:53:30 -0500 (EST)
From: DARWIN@iris.uncg.edu
Subject: Postgraduate studentships in archaeology (fwd from AEGEANET)
To: darwin-l@ukanaix.cc.ukans.edu
Organization: University of NC at Greensboro

--begin forwarded message--------------

Date: Mon, 24 Feb 1997 11:27:02 +0000 (GMT)
From: "Sturt W. Manning" <S.W.Manning@reading.ac.uk>
Subject: AEGEANET Postgraduate Research Studentships, Archaeology, at
         Reading, UK
To: aegeanet@acpub.duke.edu

ANNOUNCEMENT

The Faculty of Letters and Social Sciences at the University of Reading,
UK, which includes the Department of Archaeology, invites applications for
12 postgraduate research studentships (PhD, or MA and then PhD).

The Department of Archaeology at Reading was just awarded a top 5 (out of
5) rating in the December 1996 UK government Research Assessment Exercise,
and has a strong graduate student body of about 20 full-time and several
other part-time members.

The Department carries out research and fieldwork in prehistoric European
archaeology, Aegean, Cypriot and east Mediterranean archaeology, Roman
archaeology, and Medieval European archaeology.  Theoretical archaeology,
science-dating and its application in archaeology, gender archaeology, the
archaeology of landscape, GIS and computer modelling, and cognitive
archaeology are major research themes within the Department.  Current
excavation projects are in the UK, Spain, France, Italy, Cyprus and
Russia.

MA courses (degree in itself, and as a 1st of a 4-year PhD programme) are
available in:

Archaeology (general European-Mediterranean course)
Mediterranean Archaeology
Cognitive Evolution
Buildings Archaeology
Burial Archaeology
City of Rome

Applications in any of the above regional or subject areas would be very
welcome.  Interdisciplinary applications would also be welcome (e.g.
mixing archaeological themes, or integrating Classics, History, History of
Art, Sociology, etc.)

The Department is keen to strengthen further its work in prehistoric
Aegean, Cypriot, and east Mediterranean archaeology and research, and
especially invites applications in these areas in the contexts of the
present internet listings.  Present major research projects concern:  the
origins and development of complex society in the Aegean and the development
of the state, Aegean chronology, trade, and elite symbolism especially vis
a vis the east Mediterranean, social complexity and development on Cyprus,
the 'Tsaroukkas, Mycenaeans and Trade Project', the 'Maroni Valley
Archaeological Survey Project', 'The East Mediterranean Radiocarbon
Calibration Project' and general science-based dating interests and work,
a PhD on art and prestige in the Theran frescoes, a PhD on burial
practices in Mycenaean Greece, and a PhD on GIS approaches to political
hierarchy in Minoan Crete.

Applications are sought from all and any UK, EU, and overseas candidates
of merit.

The scholarships as offered will cover UK/EU fees and maintenance.

Overseas applicants should therefore apply also (from/via Reading) for the
Overseas Research Students Awards Scheme (ORS) which covers the difference
between overseas fees and UK/EU fees.  The Reading studentships and an ORS
award would provide a complete fees and maintenance package.  Overseas
students should investigate any other external sources of funding (USA,
Commonwealth, etc.).

UK applicants are expected also to apply for British Academy Studentships
and to accept these if offered.

APPLICATIONS CLOSE FRIDAY 21 MARCH 1997.  Please obtain a form and apply
as soon as possible.

For further information on the Department of Archaeology at Reading,
please contact:

The Postgraduate Admissions Tutor,
Department of Archaeology,
The University of Reading,
PO Box 218 Whiteknights,
Reading RG6 6AA.

Fax.  +44 118 9316718
Tel.  +44 118 9318132

e-mail:  M.A.James@reading.ac.uk

For further information and application forms for the studentships, and
for ORS awards, please contact:

Margaret Pyle,
Executive Assistant (Postgraduate),
Faculty of Letters & Social Sciences,
The University of Reading,
Po Box 218 Whiteknights,
Reading RG6 6AA.

Tel. +44 118 9318067
fax. +44 118 9310748

e-mail:  m.pyle@reading.ac.uk

--end forwarded message----------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:19>From mghiselin@casmail.calacademy.org Fri Feb 28 12:24:36 1997

Date: Fri, 28 Feb 97 10:37:24 PST
From: mghiselin@casmail.calacademy.org (Ghiselin, Michael)
To: darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu
Subject: Re: DARWIN-L digest 746

          Student Internships:
               Jeremy Ahouse asked about internship programs for
          students in the area of evolutionary biology.  The
          California Academy of sciences has a Summer Systematics
          Institute, which provides research experience in systematics
          for undergraduates, through working with our curators.  We
          have NSF support for this.  Although all positions are
          filled for 1997, we will continue in future years.
          Information can be obtained by visiting the Academy website,
          or by writing the Office of the Director of Research,
          California Academy of Sciences, Golden Gate Park, San
          Francisco, CA 94118.
               I take advantage of this opportunity to point out that
          the Academy also has a Center for the History and Philosophy
          of Science, of which I am Chair.  Although we do not have
          funds for visitors we are trying to set up a good
          environment for persons interested in the history and
          philosophy of science, especially of systematics, and have
          one post doctoral fellow in residence at present.  Inquiries
          about this should be sent to me.
          Michael T. Ghiselin

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:20>From MNHVZ082%SIVM.BITNET@KUHUB.CC.UKANS.EDU Fri Feb 28 08:06:23 1997

Date: Fri, 28 Feb 1997 09:02:25 -0500 (EST)
From: Kevin de Queiroz <MNHVZ082%SIVM.BITNET@KUHUB.CC.UKANS.EDU>
Subject: Re: summer programs for undergrads
To: Darwin-L <darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu>

Jeremy Ahouse asked about summer internship programs.  The National
Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian has such a program.
For details, contact Mary Sangrey, the coordinator of the Research
Training Program:

Mary Sangrey
Program Coordinator
NHB 166
Smithsonian Institution
Washington, D.C. 20560
(202) 357-4548
mnhbo012@sivm.si.edu

Kevin de Queiroz

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:21>From rog@cns.brown.edu Thu Feb 27 11:33:38 1997

From: rog@cns.brown.edu (Roger B. Blumberg)
Subject: MendelWeb 97.1
To: darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu
Date: Thu, 27 Feb 1997 12:06:47 -0500 (EST)

MendelWeb (97.1) is now available. Major additions to this
(6th) edition include: Robert C.Olby's previously unpublished essay,
"Mendel, Mendelism, and Genetics"; Viteslav Orel's "Heredity
Before Mendel", the second chapter of his recent biography, GREGOR
MENDEL: THE FIRST GENETICIST; and "In the Footsteps of Mendel", an
illustrated account of a journey to Brno, by Margaret Peaslee. The
MendelWeb Timeline has been revised and expanded, as have the
Bibliography and Reference pages. MendelWeb is a Web-based
teaching and learning resource, constructed upon Gregor Mendel's
well-known pea-plant paper of 1865.

MendelWeb is available at Netspace
(http://www.netspace.org/MendelWeb/),
the University of Washington at Seattle
(http://www-hpcc.astro.washington.edu/mirrors/MendelWeb/),
and at the Scholarly Technology Group, Brown University
(http://www.stg.brown.edu/MendelWeb/).

Roger

  _______________________________________________________________
                        Roger B. Blumberg
                     Roger_Blumberg@Brown.edu
           phone:(401) 863-3690  fax:(401) 863-9313
       http://www.stg.brown.edu/stg/staff_pages/roger.html
  ---------------------------------------------------------------
  Senior Hypermedia Researcher |        Visiting Scholar
   Scholarly Technology Group  | Inst. for Brain & Neural Systems
   Box 1885, Brown University  | Box 1843, Brown University 02912
  ---------------------------------------------------------------

_______________________________________________________________________________

<42:22>From chefboy@socrates.berkeley.edu Thu Feb 27 20:30:34 1997

Date: Thu, 27 Feb 1997 18:54:40 -0800
To: darwin-l@raven.cc.ukans.edu
From: chefboy@socrates.berkeley.edu (Jason D. Patent)
Subject: Re: Intro of new subscriber

At 8:22 AM 2/27/97, ED BOSTICK (BIOLOGY FACULTY) wrote:

>I am a biology prof at Kennesaw State University in Georgia. Currently teach
>GenBiol, EarthSci, Plant Systematics, NatHist of Ga, and several others.
>Research on forest disturbance ecology., biology and folk history of Kudzu.
>
>Have become interested in the well-known and oft-cited parallels between
>biological and linguistic evolution. Would like to learn more about the
>linguistic equivalents of biological "mutation" and "selection". In other
>words, what causes linguistic change and then what causes these changes to
>become established in a population?

A number of linguists at UC Berkeley have done work on various sorts of
language change, most notably sound change and semantic change.  I'm just
becoming familiar with this work myself.  For an excellent, thorough
discussion of semantic change, see Eve Sweetser 1990:  From Etymology to
Pragmatics:  Metaphorical and cultural aspects of semantic structure
(Cambridge:  Cambridge UP).  As for sound change, I know William Labov has
written a great deal on it; I'm in the process of checking into some
references myself, and will post them once I've got them.

Hope this helps,

Jason D. Patent
Graduate Student, Dept. of Linguistics
UC Berkeley
chefboy@socrates.berkeley.edu
http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~chefboy

_______________________________________________________________________________
Darwin-L Message Log 42: 1-22 -- February 1997                              End

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