Family Card - Person Sheet
Family Card - Person Sheet

NameElisabeth KINSLEY 110
Death Date3 Jul 1706
Death PlaceDunstable, Massachusetts
FlagsKilled by Indians, Queen Anne’s War (1702-13)
FatherSamuel KINGSLEY (-1662)
MotherHannah BRACKETT (bp. 1635-1706)
Misc. Notes
Elizabeth (Kinsley) Cummings died when shot by Indians near her garrison house on the Dunstable-Tyngsboro Road.
Spouses
Birth Datesay 1658
Death Dateaft 1732
FatherJohn CUMMINGS (bp. 1630-1700)
MotherSarah HOWLETT (~1639-1700)
Misc. Notes
According to Mooar’s Descendants of Isaac Cummings261, “4. JOHN CUMMINGS (John2, Isaac1) married Sept. 13, 1680, Elisabeth, daughter of Samuel and Hannah (Bracket) Kinsley, of Billerica, Mass. Hannah Bracket, daughter of Capt. Richard and Alice, was baptised Nov. 4, 1634, in Boston. He is probably the John who is designated as ‘Serg’t Cummings,’ and was one of a small garrison in Dunstable established Dec. 25, 1702, under the command of Lt. Col. Jonathan Tyng. It is usually stated that it was the garrison at his own house which was assaulted, July 3, 1706, by a party of two hundred Mohawk Indians. His house stood on the right hand of the road from Dunstable to the present town of Tyngsborough, about a half mile from the former place. The stories of the attack are not harmonious in all particulars. It seems to be agreed that there was a company of soldiers in the garrison at the time and that they were surprised. ‘At sunset a Mr. Cummings and his wife went out to milk their cows and left the gate open. The Indians who had advanced undiscovered, started up, shot Mrs. Cummings dead (‘Goody Cummings died July 3, 1706, at night.’) upon the spot, and wounded her husband who had his arm broken, but was so fortunate as to reach the woods while the Indians were engaged in the house. That night he lay in a swamp in the northerly part of Tyngsborough, about a quarter of a mile west of the great road, and a few rods south of the state line. The next day he arrived at the garrison near Tyngsborough Village.’ (1. N. H. Hist. Coll. 133.) He is spoken of as selectmen in 1711 and in the same year the house of Mr. John Cummings was reported as one of seven fortified houses in Dunstable, having two families, two males, two soldiers, and twenty-one persons in all. ‘Sarg’t Cummings & Henry Farwell were deputed in 1717, Jan. 10, by vote of the town to [p. 11] get a minister as soon as they can.’ May 20th, 1725, after the sad occasion of Capt. Lovewell’s defeat, both John Cummings and John Cummings Jr. joined with the Selectmen and other citizens in petitioning the Governor and Council of Mass. for protection in the defenceless condition of the community. The question arises whether the elder John had remarried. It is on record that ‘John Cummings of Groton, weaver, and wife Elisabeth, widow of John Sollendino, sold land in Groton, 1732.’ Sollendino was married 1679-80, to Elisabeth Usher, said to be the first marriage in Dunstable. He was a carpenter and helped build the meetinghouse in 1677 and a bridge over Salmon Creek, 1699. His house was one of seven garrisons in 1711.” [A list of John Cummings’ children follows.]
Marr Date13 Sep 1680
ChildrenJohn (1682-1759)
 Samuel (1684-1718)
 Elisabeth (1687-)
 Sarah (1690-)
 Ebenezer (1695-1724)
 Ann (1698-)
 Lydia (Died as Infant) (1701-1701)
 William (1702-1757)
Last Modified 19 Nov 1998Created 1 Dec 2017 using Reunion for Macintosh
New England genealogy files of Robert J. O’Hara, automatically output by Reunion for Macintosh. For additional genealogical data in other formats, including specialized lists of immigrant ancestors and notable kin, please visit my main genealogy page: http://rjohara.net/gen/ For information about many of the localities mentioned here please visit NewEnglandTowns.org: http://newenglandtowns.org