Peabody Park > Survey > Flowering Plants

Peabody Park Biological Survey

Flowering Plants

This page is part of a biological survey of Peabody Park at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Nomenclature for the taxa below follows Radford, Ahles, and Bell, Manual of the Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Chapel Hill, 1968). Initials of determiners and locations of grid sections are explained on the references page. Flowering times are very incompletely recorded.

  1. POACEAE — Grasses and their allies

    1. Arundinaria gigantea — Cane

      Found in sections F10 and G10 of the Park woods at scattered locations along creek margins. (RJO, February 1998) [Images…]

    2. Cynodon dactylon — Bermuda Grass

      One of the principal lawn grasses of the campus; common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas. April–September. (RJO, May 1999)

    3. Paspalum dilatatum — Dallis Grass

      One of the principal lawn grasses of the campus; common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas. September. (RJO, September 1997)

    4. Digitaria sanguinalis — Crab Grass

      One of the principal lawn grasses of the campus; common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas. September. (RJO, September 1997)

    5. Grass spp.

      Many different grasses occur in the Park in addition to those listed here. Study of the Park grasses would be an excellent project for an advanced student. (RJO, March 2000)

  2. CYPERACEAE — Sedges and their allies

    1. Sedge spp.

      The sedges are a large and difficult group, similar in appearance ot the grasses but with triangular stems and distinctive flowers; many species can be found in the Park but none have been precisely identified. Cyperus lancastriensis, C. refractus, and C. ovularis may be among the common large species. Study of the Park sedges would be an excellent project for an advanced student. August–October. (RJO, October 2000)

  3. ARACEAE — Arums and their allies

    1. Arisaema triphyllum — Jack-in-the-Pulpit

      Known only from one location in section F8 of the Park woods on the W border of the creek behind Ragsdale-Mendenhall Hall. April. (RJO, April 1998)

  4. COMMELINACEAE — Spiderworts and their allies

    1. Commelina communis — Asiatic Dayflower

      Common in the Park fields and other disturbed areas of the campus. May–September. Alien. (RJO, September 1997)

  5. JUNCACEAE — Rushes

    1. Juncus spp. — Rushes

      Common at various locations in the Park; a large and difficult group of grass-like plants that requires special study. March. (RJO, March 2000)

  6. LILIACEAE — Lilies and their allies

    1. Smilax rotundifolia — Greenbrier, Catbrier

      Common in the Park woods and in thickets elsewhere on campus. April. (RHL/RJO, April 1998)

    2. Smilax spp. — Greenbrier, Catbrier

      A large and difficult genus of thorny vines; bona-nox, hispida, and other species may be present in addition to rotundifolia. (RJO, April 1998)

    3. Trillium cuneatum — Red Trillium, Little Sweet Betsy

      Common in the Park woods at scattered locations. March–April. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    4. Trillium catesbaei — Catesby’s Trillium

      Known only from one individual in section G10 of the Park woods, N of Grogan Hall. April–May. (RJO, April 1998)

    5. Trillium grandiflorum — White Trillium

      Known only from one individual in section G10 of the Park woods, N of Grogan Hall. March–April. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    6. Smilacina racemosa — False Solomon’s-Seal

      Common in the Park woods at scattered locations. April–May. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    7. Polygonatum biflorum — Solomon’s Seal

      Common in the Park woods at scattered locations, though not as common as False Solomon’s-Seal. April–May. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    8. Yucca filamentosa — Yucca, Spanish Bayonet, Bear Grass

      Planted as an ornamental at scattered locations in the Park. (RJO, March 1998)

    9. Erythronium americanum — Trout Lily

      Known primarily from two large stations in the Park woods where it forms dense carpets along creeks: in section G10 N of Grogan Hall, and in section F8 SW of Reynolds Hall. February–April. (RJO, February 2000) [Images…]

    10. Ornithogalum umbellatum — Star of Bethlehem

      Common in Park fields, especially along creek borders. Late March–May. Alien. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    11. Uvularia sp. — Bellwort

      Recorded from section F9 of the Park woods E of Ragsdale-Mendenhall Hall. April. (RJO, March 1998)

    12. Allium vineale — Field Garlic, Wild Onion

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. Alien. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

  7. DIOSCOREACEAE — Yams and their allies

    1. Dioscorea villosa — Wild Yam

      Recorded from section G10 of Park woods. (RJO, November 1997)

  8. AMARYLLIDACEAE — Daffodils and their allies

    1. Narcissus pseudonarcissus — Daffodil, Jonquil

      Found at scattered locations throughout the Park; probably planted as an ornamental by early campus landscapers. February–March. Alien. (RJO, February 1998) [Images…]

  9. IRIDACEAE — Irises and their allies

    1. Sisyrinchium sp. — Blue-eyed Grass

      Recorded from from scattered locations in the Park fields and in disturbed areas along margins of the woods. Late March–May. (RJO/RHL, May 1998)

    2. Iris pseudacorus — Yellow Iris, Yellow Flag

      Recorded only from section G11 of Park woods along creek border. May. Alien. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    3. Iris cristata — Crested Dwarf Iris

      Recorded from Park section F9 along stream bank NW of Reynolds Hall. April. (RJO/RHL, April 1998)

  10. ORCHIDACEAE — Orchids

    1. Tipularia discolor — Crane-fly Orchid

      Widespread in the Park woods, but very inconspicuous; leaves appear after flowers wither and then persist through the winter. August. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

  11. SALICACEAE — Willows, poplars, and their allies

    1. Salix nigra — Black Willow

      Common small tree along creek branches in the Park fields. April. (RJO, May 1998)

    2. Populus deltoides — Cottonwood

      Recorded from section E11 of Park fields along stream bank. (RHL, September 1998)

  12. MYRICACEAE — Waxmyrtles, bayberries, and their allies

    1. Myrica cerifera — Southern Bayberry, Wax Myrtle

      Commonly planted as an ornamental shrub at various locations on campus. The berries are a favorite food of Yellow-rumped Warblers in winter. March–April. (RJO, February 2000)

  13. JUGLANDACEAE — Walnuts, hickories, and their allies

    1. Juglans nigra — Black Walnut

      Scattered individuals found in the Park, mainly on edges of open areas. April. (RJO/RHL, September 1997) [Images…]

    2. Carya illinoensis — Pecan

      None recorded from the Park, but planted as a shade tree at several other locations on campus. May. (RJO, September 1997)

    3. Carya ovata — Shagbark Hickory

      Scattered individuals found throughout the Park woods and elsewhere on campus. (RJO/RHL, September 1997)

    4. Carya tomentosa — Mockernut Hickory

      Scattered individuals found throughout the Park woods and elsewhere on campus. (RHL/RJO, November 1997)

    5. Carya glabra — Pignut Hickory

      Recorded from sections F9 and G10 of Park woods. (RHL/RJO, November 1997)

  14. BETULACEAE — Birches

    1. Corylus americana — Hazelnut

      A small tree known only from one station in section F8 along service drive E of Ragsdale-Mendenhall Hall. March. (RJO, March 2000)

    2. Betula nigra — River Birch, Black Birch

      Planted as an ornamental tree at scattered locations on campus. (RJO, November 1997)

    3. Ostrya virginiana — Eastern Hophornbeam

      Scattered individuals in the vicinity of sections C10 and E11. (RJO/RHL, October 1997)

    4. Carpinus caroliniana — American Hornbeam, Ironwood

      Scattered individuals in the Park woods, typically near water as at section G9 W of Grogan Hall. March. (RJO/RHL, March 2000) [Images…]

  15. FAGACEAE — Beeches, chestnuts, oaks, and allies

    1. Fagus grandifolia — American Beech

      A common large tree of the Park woods, especially in section F11 E of Phillips-Hawkins Hall, and planted elsewhere on campus as an ornamental. Late March–April. (RJO/RHL, March 2000) [Images…]

    2. Castanea sp. — Chestnut

      Planted chestnuts are known from three locations on campus including section D10 W of Moore-Strong Hall; they are probably Chinese or hybrid forms, but their identity has not been determined. May. (RJO, March 1998)

    3. Quercus alba — White Oak

      One of the principal canopy trees of the Park woods and widely planted elsewhere on campus as a shade tree. (RJO/RHL, September 1997) [Images…]

    4. Quercus stellata — Post Oak

      An uncommon canopy tree recorded from scattered locations in the Park woods including section H9 S of Cone Hall and section E10 W of Moore-Strong Hall. March–April. (RJO/RHL, September 1997)

    5. Quercus rubra — Northern Red Oak

      An uncommon tree of the Park woods, recorded from section H9 S of Cone Hall and at other scattered locations. (RHL/RJO, October 1997) [Images…]

    6. Quercus velutina — Black Oak

      Scattered individuals in the Park woods, N of Grogan Hall. (RHL/RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    7. Quercus falcata — Southern Red Oak, Spanish Oak

      One of the principal canopy trees of the Park woods and widely planted elsewhere on campus as a shade tree. The nominate variety falcata is most common, but the variety pagodaefolia (Cherrybark Oak) is also present in the Park. March–April. (RHL, May 1998) [Images…]

    8. Quercus phellos — Willow Oak

      Scattered individuals in the Park woods and fields; commonly planted on campus as a shade tree. March–April. (RJO, March 2000) [Images…]

  16. ULMACEAE — Elms and their allies

    1. Ulmus rubra — Slippery Elm

      Recorded from sections G10 and H10 and other scattered locations in the Park woods. February. (RHL/RJO, April 1998)

    2. Ulmus alata — Winged Elm

      Recorded from sections F8 and G8 and other scattered locations in the Park woods; this species and the previous are easily confused and deserve careful study. February–March. (RHL/RJO, March 2000)

    3. Celtis laevigata — Sugarberry

      An uncommon small tree recorded from section H9 of Park woods along North Drive, from G9 along stream W of Grogan Hall, and from B10 and C11 on hillside N of amphitheater. (RJO/RHL, December 1997) [Images…]

  17. MORACEAE — Mulberries and their allies

    1. Morus rubra — Red Mulberry

      A large shrub or small tree common at weedy locations in the Park fields and forest edges. April. (RJO/RHL, September 1997) [Images…]

  18. URTICACEAE — Nettles and their allies

    1. Boehmeria cylindrica — False Nettle, Bog Hemp

      Recorded from Park section G11 in fall. September. (RJO, October 2000)

  19. ARISTOLOCIACEAE — Birthworts and their allies

    1. Hexastylis arifolia — Wild Ginger, Heartleaf

      Known from two individuals only, in sections F8 and G10 of the Park woods. Late March–May. (RJO/RHL, March 1998) [Images…]

    2. Hexastylis minor — Wild Ginger, Heartleaf

      Scattered individuals found throughout the Park woods. March–May. (RJO/RHL, March 1998) [Images…]

  20. POLYGONACEAE — Buckwheats and their allies

    1. Polygonum pensylvanicum — Pennsylvania Smartweed

      Common in disturbed areas in the Park and elsewhere on campus. September–October. (RJO, October 2000) [Images…]

    2. Polygonum cespitosum — Long-bristled Smartweed

      Common in disturbed areas in the Park and elsewhere on campus. September–November. Alien. (RJO/RHL, October 2000) [Images…]

    3. Polygonum sagittatum — Arrow-leaved Tearthumb

      Uncommon along creek branches in the Park fields. (RJO/RHL, September 1997)

  21. CHENOPODIACEAE — Goosefoot and allies

    1. Chenopodium album — Lamb’s-quarters, Pigweed

      Recorded from stream banks in section D11 of the Park fields. September. Alien. (RJO/RHL, September 1998)

  22. AMARANTHACEAE — Amaranths and allies

    1. Amaranthus hybridus — Green Amaranth

      Recorded from stream banks in section D11 of the Park fields. September. Alien. (RJO/RHL, September 1998)

  23. PHYTOLACCACEAE — Pokeweed and allies

    1. Phytolacca americana — Poke, Pokeweed

      Common in disturbed areas in the Park and elsewhere on campus. May–September. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

  24. PORTULACACEAE — Purslanes and their allies

    1. Claytonia virginica — Spring-beauty

      Known only from one station in section G10 of the Park woods N of Grogan Hall. March–April. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

  25. CAROPHYLLACEAE — Pinks and their allies

    1. Stellaria media — Common Chickweed

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. November–May. Alien. (RJO, March 1997)

    2. Cerastium holosteoides (=C. vulgatum) — Mouse-eared Chickweed

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. March–April. Alien. (RHL/RJO, April 1998)

  26. RANUNCULACEAE — Buttercups and their allies

    1. Ranunculus abortivus — Kidneyleaf Buttercup

      Occasional in the Park fields and other disturbed areas on campus. March–April. (RJO, April 1998)

    2. Ranunculus bulbosus — Bulbous Buttercup

      Common in the Park fields and other disturbed areas on campus. March–May. Alien. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    3. Hepatica americana — Round-lobed Hepatica, Liverleaf

      Known only from one station in section E12 of the Park woods E of Gray Drive. March. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

  27. BERBERIDACEAE — Barberries and their allies

    1. Mahonia bealei — Grape Holly

      Commonly planted as an ornamental on campus. Escaped individuals found at scattered locations in the Park woods; many of these are being eradicated during 1999–2000. January–March. Alien. (RJO, January 1999) [Images…]

    2. Nandina domestica — Heavenly Bamboo

      Commonly planted as an ornamental on campus. Escaped individuals found at scattered locations in the Park. Alien. (RJO, February 1998)

    3. Podophyllum peltatum — Mayapple

      Common in the Park woods at selected locations. March–April. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

  28. MAGNOLIACEAE — Magnolias and their allies

    1. Liriodendron tulipifera — Tuliptree, Tulip-Poplar, Yellow-Poplar

      Common in the Park woods and planted elsewhere on campus as a shade tree. April–May. (RJO/RHL, September 1997) [Images…]

    2. Magnolia grandiflora — Southern Magnolia, Bull Bay

      Commonly planted on campus as an ornamental. Escaped individuals found in section G10 and at other scattered locations in the Park woods. May. (RJO/RHL, September 1997) [Images…]

  29. ANNONACEAE — Custard-apples and their allies

    1. Asimina triloba — Pawpaw

      Common along streams in the Park woods N, W, and S of Reynolds Hall. Late March–April. (RJO/RHL, March 2000)

  30. CALYCANTHACEAE — Calycanthus and allies

    1. Calycanthus floridus — Sweetshrub, Spicebush

      Known only from three stations in sections F9 and G9 of Park between Gove Health Center and Reynolds Hall. April–May. (RJO, April 1998) [Images…]

  31. LAURACEAE — Laurels and their allies

    1. Sassafras albidum — Sassafras

      Known from scattered locations in the Park woods, including section E11 W of Phillips-Hawkins Hall, G10 N of Grogan Hall, and G8 S of Reynolds Hall. (RJO/RHL, February 1998) [Images…]

    2. Lindera benzoin — Spicebush

      Known only from one individual in danger of being destroyed in section G9 along the W wall of Reynolds Hall; an inconspicuous plant when not in flower; it may occur elsewhere in the Park but has not yet been recorded. March. (RJO, March 2000)

  32. BRASSICACEAE — Mustards and their allies

    1. Cardamine sp. — Bitter Cress

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus; probably more than one species present. January–March. (RJO/RHL, January 1999)

    2. Mustards spp.

      Several species of small yellow and white mustards occur in the Park fields and in other disturbed areas on campus, but they have not been identified. (RJO, March 2000)

  33. HAMAMELIDACEAE — Witch-hazels and their allies

    1. Liquidambar styraciflua — Sweetgum

      Common in the Park and widely planted elsewhere on campus as a shade tree. April. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    2. Hamamelis virginiana — Witch-hazel

      Planted as an ornamental shrub in the Park between Grogan and Reynolds Halls and elsewhere on campus. February–March. (RJO, March 1998)

  34. PLATANACEAE — Sycamores and their allies

    1. Platanus occidentalis — American Sycamore

      Common in the Park, especially along creek margins. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

  35. ROSACEAE — Roses and their allies

    1. Duchesnea indica — Indian Strawberry, Mock Strawberry

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. March–November. Alien. (RJO, October 2000)

    2. Rubus sp. — Blackberry, Raspberry

      A large and difficult genus; several species may be present in the Park. May. (RJO, May 1998)

    3. Malus angustifolia — Southern Crab Apple

      Planted as an ornamental tree in the Park and elsewhere on campus. March–April. (RJO, March 1998)

    4. Amelanchier arborea — Sarvisstree, Serviceberry, Shadbush

      Known only from three individuals in section E11. March. (RJO, March 2000)

    5. Prunus serotina — Black Cherry

      Recorded from scattered locations in the Park, including section H10 in Park woods along stream bank, section G8 S of Reynolds Hall, and section C11 along border of Park fields. April. (RHL, February 1998) [Images…]

  36. FABACEAE — Peas and their allies

    1. Albizia julibrissin — Mimosa, Silktree

      Found at scattered locations in the Park fields, usually along creek margins. Alien. June. (RJO, September 1997)

    2. Cercis canadensis — Eastern Redbud, Judas Tree

      A characteristic understory tree of the Park woods, and found at scattered other locations on campus. Often planted as an ornamental. March–April; occasional late flowers September–October. (RJO, October 2000) [Images…]

    3. Trifolium pratense — Red Clover

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. April–May. Alien. (RJO, September 1997)

    4. Trifolium repens — White Clover

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. February–November. Alien. (RJO, October 2000)

    5. Trifolium campestre (=T. procumbens) — Smaller Hop Clover

      Occasional on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. March–November. Alien. (RJO/RHL, October 2000)

    6. Trifolium dubium — Least Hop Clover, Low Hop Clover

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. March–May. Alien. (RJO/RHL, April 1998)

    7. Melilotus alba — White Sweet Clover

      Common in Park fields along creek margins. Alien. (RJO, September 1997)

    8. Coronilla varia — Crown Vetch

      Uncommon along creek margins in Park fields. May. Alien. (RJO, April 1998) [Images…]

    9. Desmodium sp. — Tick-trefoil, Beggar Ticks

      Common in disturbed areas in the Park. September–October. (RJO, October 2000)

    10. Wisteria sinensis — Wisteria

      An ornamental vine known from section E10 W of Moore-Strong Hall and section H8 along North Drive. Late March–April. Alien. (RJO, March 2000)

    11. Vicia sativa — Spring Vetch

      Common around margins of Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. March–May. Alien. (RJO/RHL, April 1998)

    12. Robinia pseudo-acacia — Black Locust

      Scattered individuals recorded from sections C10 and C11 along margins of Park fields. April. (RHL/RJO, November 1997)

  37. OXALIDACEAE — Wood-Sorrels and their allies

    1. Oxalis violacea — Violet Wood Sorrel

      Recorded along creek margins in sections D11 and H9. April–May. (RJO/RHL, April 1998) [Images…]

    2. Oxalis sp. — Yellow Wood Sorrel

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. Late March–November. (RJO, September 1997)

  38. GERANIACEAE — Geraniums and their allies

    1. Geranium carolinianum — Carolina Cranesbill

      Common in disturbed areas in the Park and elsewhere on campus. May. (RJO, September 1997)

  39. RUTACEAE — Rues and their allies

    1. Poncirus trifoliata — Trifoliate Orange

      An ornamental shrub planted in the Park and elsewhere on campus. March–April. (RJO, March 1998)

  40. ANACARDIACEAE — Cashews, sumacs, and their allies

    1. Rhus radicans — Poison Ivy

      Relatively common in second growth areas in the Park woods and fields. May. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    2. Rhus copallina — Shining Sumac

      Scattered individuals found in second growth areas on the borders of the Park woods and in the Park fields. September. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

  41. AQUIFOLIACEAE — Hollies and their allies

    1. Ilex opaca — American Holly

      Widely planted on campus as an ornamental and found at scattered locations in the Park. (RHL/RJO, April 1998)

    2. Ilex sp. — Holly

      A number of species of ornamental hollies are planted on campus and some have escaped into the Park; some flower as early as March. (RJO, March 2000)

  42. CELASTRACEAE — Bittersweet and allies

    1. Celastrus sp. — Bittersweet

      Known from section E11 along Gray Drive. (RJO, December 2000)

    2. Euonymus americanus — Strawberry Bush, Hearts-a-busting

      A common and characteristic shrub of the Park woods. May. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    3. Euonymus alatus — Winged Euonymus, Burning Bush

      A commonly cultivated shrub; escaped to several locations in the Park. April–May. Alien. (RJO, March 1998)

  43. ACERACEAE — Maples and their allies

    1. Acer rubrum — Red Maple

      Found at scattered locations in the Park and elsewhere on campus. Often planted as an ornamental. February–March. (RJO, February 2000) [Images…]

    2. Acer saccharinum — Silver Maple

      Found at scattered locations in second growth borders in the Park. March. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    3. Acer saccharum — Sugar Maple

      Found at scattered locations in the Park and elsewhere on campus. Often planted as an ornamental. (RJO, March 1998) [Images…]

  44. HIPPOCASTANACEAE — Horsechestnuts and their allies

    1. Aesculus sylvatica — Buckeye

      Recorded from section F8 of Park woods along road E of Ragsdale-Mendenhall Hall. Late March–April. (RJO/RHL, May 1998)

    2. Aesculus hippocastaneum — Horsechestnut

      Not recorded from the Park, but planted elsewhere on campus as an ornamental. April. Alien. (RJO, March 1998)

  45. BALSAMINACEAE — Touch-me-nots and their allies

    1. Impatiens capensis — Jewelweed, Spotted Touch-me-not

      Common in the Park fields along creek margins. September–November. (RJO, October 2000)

  46. VITACEAE — Grapes and their allies

    1. Parthenocissus rotundifolia — Virginia Creeper

      Common climbing vine of Park woods and field margins. (RJO, April 1998)

    2. Vitis rotundifolia — Muscadine

      Recorded from section G11 of Park woods. (November 1997)

    3. Vitis vulpina — Frost Grape

      Scattered individuals along the stream banks in sections C11 and D11 of Park fields. May have been destroyed by grounds department in 1999. May. (RJO/RHL, December 2000)

    4. Ampelopsis sp. — Peppervine, Porcelain Berry

      Shrubby vine with colorful blue and purple berries in fall; common along creek margins in Park fields. September. Alien. (RJO, October 1997) [Images…]

  47. TILIACEAE — Basswoods and their allies

    1. Tilia sp. — Basswood, Linden

      Recorded from section H9 of Park woods S of Grogan Hall. (RJO/RHL, May 1998)

  48. MALVACEAE — Mallows and their allies

    1. Hibiscus moscheutos — Crimson-eyed Rose Mallow

      One individual recorded from the creek margin in section C11 of the Park fields. (RJO, September 1997)

  49. VIOLACEAE — Violets and their allies

    1. Viola sp. — Violets

      Cultivated violets were widely planted on campus in the early years of the University, and persist in the Park at many locations. March–April; occasional individuals flower as late as October. (RJO/RHL, March 1998)

    2. Viola rafinesquii. (=V. kitaibeliana) — Field Pansy

      Common in the Park fields and other disturbed areas on campus. February–April. (RJO, March 2000)

  50. ELAEAGNACEAE

    1. Elaeagnus sp. — Russian Olive, Silverberry

      An escape from cultivation recorded from scattered locations throughout the Park woods; semi-evergreen so most easily seen in early winter. Some specimens flower in April and others September–January; these may be different species or cultivars. (RJO, April 2000) [Images…]

  51. MELASTOMATACEAE — Primroses and their allies

    1. Oenothera biennis — Evening Primrose

      Common in the Park fields along creek margins. September. (RJO, September 1997)

    2. Oenothera laciniata — Cut-leaved Evening Primrose

    3. Oenothera cf. fruticosa — Sundrops

      Recorded from section D10 of the Park fields near creek. O. fruticosa and its near relatives are not well understood biologically and are difficult to identify. (RJO, September 1997)

  52. ARALIACEAE — Ivies and their allies

    1. Hedera helix — Ivy

      Formerly planted around campus buildings as an ornamental, but now an invasive weed at several locations in the Park woods. A project to gradually eradicate the Ivy in the Park woods was begun in the Fall of 1998 with the help of student volunteers. Alien. (RJO, February 1999) [Images…]

  53. APIACEAE — Parsley and allies

    1. Daucus carota — Queen Anne’s Lace, Wild Carrot

      Recorded from Park fields along stream banks. Alien. (RJO, April 1998)

    2. Osmorhiza longistylis — Sweet Chervil

      Recorded from section G12 of Park woods. April. (RHL/RJO, April 1998)

    3. Cicuta maculata — Water Hemlock

      Recorded from Park fields along stream banks. April. (RHL/RJO, April 1998)

  54. NYSSACEAE — Tupelos

    1. Nyssa sylvatica — Black Gum, Black Tupelo

      Recorded from section H9 of Park woods along North Drive. May. (RHL/RJO, May 1998)

  55. CORNACEAE — Dogwoods and their allies

    1. Cornus florida — Flowering Dogwood

      A common and characteristic understory tree of the Park woods, and planted as an ornamental elsewhere on campus. March–May. (RJO, September 1997)

    2. Cornus stricta — Swamp Dogwood

      Known from one individual in section F8 of Park woods along service drive E of Ragsdale-Mendenhall Hall, and two individuals in section E11 NW of Moore-Strong Hall. Late March–April. (RJO, March 2000)

    3. Aucuba japonica — Japanese Aucuba, Spotted Laurel, Gold-dust Tree

      An escaped exotic, naturalized in section F11 of Park woods E of Phillips-Hawkins Hall. Alien. (RJO/RHL, November 1997)

  56. ERICACEAE — Rhododendrons and their allies

    1. Chimaphila maculata — Spotted Wintergreen

      Common throughout the Park woods at scattered locations. June. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    2. Rhododendron maximum — Rosebay, Great Laurel, Great Rhododendron

      Forms a dense thicket along the creek E of Ragsdale-Mendenhall Hall in the Park woods. July. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

    3. Rhododendron nudiflorum — Wild Azalea, Pinxter-flower

      Scattered individuals known from sections H9 and H10 of the Park woods. April–May. (RJO/RHL, April 1998)

    4. Oxydendrum arboreum — Sourwood

      Understory tree; recorded from section H9 of Park woods S of Cone Hall and section E9 east of Ragsdale-Mendenhall Hall. (RHL/RJO, February 1999)

    5. Vaccinium stamineum — Gooseberry

      A widespread shrub of the Park woods. April–May. (RHL/RJO, May 1998)

  57. EBENACEAE — Ebony and allies

    1. Diospyros virginiana — Common Persimmon

      Recorded from section H9 of Park woods S of Cone Hall, and also on hillside N of Park amphitheater. (RHL, April 1998)

  58. OLEACEAE — Olives, ashes, their allies

    1. Fraxinus americana — White Ash

      Recorded from scattered locations in the Park woods and planted elsewhere on campus as an ornamental. (RHL/RJO, May 1998)

    2. Fraxinus pennsylvanica — Red Ash, Green Ash

      Recorded from section F11 of Park woods N of Phillips-Hawkins Hall. (RHL, May 1998)

  59. APOCYNACEAE

    1. Vinca sp. — Periwinkle

      An escape from cultivation that is now invasive in several areas of the Park woods. Alien. March–April. (RJO, March 2000)

  60. ASCLEPIADACEAE — Milkweeds and their allies

    1. Asclepias sp. — Milkweed

      Recorded from section D10 of the Park fields. (RJO, May 1998)

  61. CONVOLVULACEAE — Morning Glories and their allies

    1. Ipomoea sp. — Morning Glory

      Recorded from section D10 of the Park fields. (RJO, May 1998)

  62. BORAGINACEAE — Forget-me-nots and their allies

    1. Myosotis sp. — Forget-me-not

      Recorded from disturbed soil on the Park border in section H8. (RJO/RHL, September 1998)

  63. LAMIACEAE — Mints and their allies

    1. Ajuga reptans — Bugle-weed

      Recorded from section C11 of Park fields. Late March–April. Alien. (RJO, March 2000)

    2. Glechoma hederacea — Gill-over-the-Ground, Ground Ivy

      Common on Park lawns. Late March–May. Alien. (RJO/RHL, March 2000)

    3. Lamium amplexicaule — Henbit

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. February–April. Alien. (RJO, February 1999)

    4. Lamium purpureum — Purple Dead-nettle

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. February–May. Alien. (RJO, February 1999) [Images…]

  64. SOLANACEAE — Nightshades and their allies

    1. Solanum carolinense — Horse-nettle

      Recorded from Park fields along creeks. September. (RJO, September 1997)

    2. Solanum americanum — Common Nightshade

      Recorded from Park fields along creeks. (RJO, September 1997)

  65. SCROPHULARIACEAE — Snapdragons and their allies

    1. Paulownia tomentosa — Princess Tree

      Recorded from campus section H5 near Mary Foust Hall and planted elsewhere as an ornamental. April. Alien. (RHL, November 1997)

    2. Verbascum thapsus — Woolly Mullein

      Recorded from disturbed areas such as section H8 along North Drive. Alien. (RJO, October 1997) [Images…]

    3. Veronica serpyllifolia — Thyme-leaved Speedwell

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. March–April. Alien. (RHL/RJO, April 1998)

    4. Veronica hederaefolia — Ivy-leaved Speedwell

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. January–March. (RJO, January 1999)

  66. BIGNONIACEAE — Trumpet Creepers and their allies

    1. Catalpa speciosa — Catawba Tree, Indian Cigar Tree

      Recorded from sections D10 and D11 of the Park fields, and planted elsewhere on campus as an ornamental. May–June. (RJO, May 1998)

  67. OROBANCHACEAE — Beech-drops and allies

    1. Epifagus virginiana — Beech-drops

      Parasitic on the roots of beech trees; common in the Park woods under beech. September–October. (RJO, September 1997) [Images…]

  68. RUBIACEAE — Bedstraws and their allies

    1. Houstonia caerulea — Bluets

      Known from sections F11, E10, and other scattered locations in the Park. March–May. (RHL/RJO, April 1998)

    2. Houstonia pusilla — Bluets

      Known only from section E10 on lawns at edge of Park woods, growing side be side with H. caerulea; smaller than caerulea and with a purple rather than yellow/white throat. March–April. (RJO, March 2000)

    3. Sherardia arvensis — Blue Field Madder

      Recorded from Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. March–May. Alien. (RJO, May 1998)

    4. Galium aparine — Cleavers

      Recorded from Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. April–May. (RHL/RJO, April 1998)

    5. Galium lanceolatum — Yellow Wild Licorice

      Recorded from Park section G9. May. (RHL/RJO, May 1998)

  69. CAPRIFOLIACEAE — Honeysuckles and their allies

    1. Lonicera japonica — Japanese Honeysuckle

      An invasive vine found at scattered locations throughout the Park. Late March–May. Alien. (RJO, May 1998)

    2. Lonicera fragrantissima — Sweet Breath of Spring, Winter Honeysuckle

      Recorded from scattered locations in the Park woods, especially sections E9–F9. December–March. Alien. (RJO, January 2000) [Images…]

    3. Lonicera sempervirens — Coral Honeysuckle

      Known from one station in section F11 of Park woods N of Phillips-Hawkins Hall. April–May. (RJO, April 1998) [Images…]

    4. Viburnum prunifolium — Black Haw, Nanny-berry

      Found in scattered locations through the Park woods. March–April. (RJO, March 2000)

  70. ASTERACEAE — Daisies and their allies

    1. Cichorium intybus — Chicory

      Recorded from disturbed areas in the Park fields. Alien. (RJO, April 1998)

    2. Sonchus asper — Spiny-leaved Sow-thistle

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. April–May. Alien. (RJO, September 1997)

    3. Taraxacum officinale — Common Dandelion

      Common on Park lawns and other disturbed areas on campus. November–May. Alien. (RJO, January 1999)

    4. Eupatorium coelestinum — Mistflower, Ageratum

      Recorded from section H10 of Park woods in fall. (RJO, November 1997)

    5. Antennaria plantaginifolia — Pussy-toes

      Recorded from field borders in Park section D11. Late March–April. (RJO, March 2000)

    6. Erigeron philadelphicus — Daisy Fleabane

      Recorded from creek margins in the Park fields. April–May. (RJO, April 1998) [Images…]

    7. Aster spp. — Asters

      Several species occur in the Park; none have been precisely identified. September–November. (RJO, October 1997)

    8. Solidago altissima — Tall Goldenrod

      Recorded from section D11 of Park fields. September. (RJO/RHL, September 1998)

    9. Solidago spp. — Goldenrods

      Several species of Solidago occur in the Park in addition to altissima; none have been precisely identified. September–November. (RJO, October 1998)

    10. Bidens frondosa — Beggar Ticks

      Common along stream edges in the Park fields and in other disturbed habitats. September–October. (RJO, October 1997) [Images…]

    11. Anthemis arvensis — Dog Fennel

      Recorded from disturbed areas in the Park fields and in the margins of the Park woods. March–May. (RHL/RJO, March 2000)

[Last major revision: May 2002]


© RJO 1995–2016