Family Card - Person Sheet
Family Card - Person Sheet

NameElizabeth TUTTLE 8
Death Date5 Jan 1823
Spouses
Birth Date1 Apr 1734
Birth PlaceBedford, Massachusetts
Death Date2 Sep 1820
FatherZachariah FITCH (1713-1800)
MotherElizabeth GRIMES (bp. 1717-1790)
Misc. Notes
According to Stearns’ Fitch genealogy,8 Zachariah Fitch “is known as Capt. Zachariah Fitch of Groton, and his name is frequently met in the annals of his time. He served in the French and Indian Wars, and was a lieutenant and later a captain in the Revolution, and distinguished in civil affairs.” His entry in MSSWR19 reads as follows: “FITCH, ZACHARIAH, Groton. 1st Lieutenant, Capt. Henry Farwell’s co. of Minute-men, Col. William Prescott’s regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 11 days; also, Captain, Col. Samuel Brewer’s regt.; engaged Aug. 3, 1776; service, 1 mo. 28 days; also, same regt.; pay abstract for mileage from Ticonderoga home, dated Dec., --, 1776.”

Zachariah Fitch held many town offices throughout his life, including keeper of one of the town’s bridges over the Nashua River. According to Butler’s History of Groton20, in October 1779 the town voted “‘That Capt. Fitch, Samuel Hemenway, John Simonds, James Adams, Caleb Blood, and Jacob Gragg, (persons living on the west side of the river,) be excused from any proportion of the highway taxes in this town in future, so long as they shall agree to keep in repair the bridge mentioned in the 12th article.’

“In April, 1803, Capt. Zachariah Fitch proposed to the town, that he would support the bridge and the two highways leading from it on the easterly side of the river the distance of twenty rods, for the sum of thirty dollars per annum, which proposition the town accepted.

“In 1806 a committee was chosen to consider and report [p. 57] what was expedient relating to the support of that bridge, who reported that Capt. Fitch ought in justice to have a grant of thirty dollars, to make present repairs, and in addition to thirty dollars annually, his proportion of the highway tax in future. This report was accepted. Capt. Fitch and his heirs have supported said bridge ever since.”

Some of his children settled near Sebago Lake, Maine, on lands he was granted for his Revolutionary service. See this website:

http://home.gwi.net/~mja114/sebago.htm

for an account of Fitch’s General Store in Sebago: “For 167 years, the Fitch family gave service to East Sebago and the area around this part of the Lakes Region. Fitch's General Store was a store that people depended on for years. Fitch's Store had most everything that you wanted. From bins to nails, Coffee makers to glass. Even keys could be made. Luther Fitch founded the store in 1830. It burnt in 1850. In 1909, Monty Fitch (Luther's Grandson ) bought the store. Just as the business was building up, the store met another disaster. It was struck by lightning in Oct. 3,1919 while Monty was on a vacation. He then moved the business into a converted stable that was attached to the house. He made it into a store and reopened it in 1920. Monty died in 1957. His son Laurence took over the business. Laurence and his English born wife,Vera, both continued to operate the business for the area. Laurence and Vera had a daughter Jill and two sons; Ward and Jack. Robert was Vera's son from another marriage. Laurence died Spring'97. Vera and her son, Jack operated the store until November. The memories are all we have now. The Fitch family gave us (not only a great general store) but, they gave us wonderful memories. Laurence and Vera always had a smile. Always willing to help.”
Marr Date11 May 1809
No Children
Last Modified 12 Jul 1998Created 1 Dec 2017 using Reunion for Macintosh
New England genealogy files of Robert J. O’Hara, automatically output by Reunion for Macintosh. For additional genealogical data in other formats, including specialized lists of immigrant ancestors and notable kin, please visit my main genealogy page: http://rjohara.net/gen/ For information about many of the localities mentioned here please visit NewEnglandTowns.org: http://newenglandtowns.org