Ancestor Report (Continued)
Ancestor Report (Continued)

Twelfth Generation
3928. Thomas TARBELL365, 9G Grandfather, son of 3590. Thomas TARBELL & 3591. Mary _____. Born abt 1642 in ? Watertown, Massachusetts. Died in Charlestown, Massachusetts, on 26 Apr 1678.

Thomas and his family evacuated Groton during King Philip’s War, and lived at Charlestown with the family of Samuel Leman or Lemant, whose wife was sister to Hannah (Longley) Tarbell. Thomas died in a smallpox outbreak that also killed his father.
He married Hannah LONGLEY365, 9G Grandmother 30 Jun or 11 Jul 1666 Charlestown, Massachusetts.
They had the following children:
1964i.
Thomas, 8G Grandfather (1667-1715)
ii.
Anna (Hannah)288,197, 9G Aunt (~1669-1732)
iii.
William288, 9G Uncle (1672-1693)
iv.
Mary288, 9G Aunt (1675-)
3929. Hannah LONGLEY365, 9G Grandmother, daughter of 798. William LONGLEY & 799. Joanna GOFFE. Born abt 1642. Died in Groton, Massachusetts, on 29 Dec 1680.
3930. Samuel WOODS. (Same as number 1792.)
3931. Alice RUSHTON. (Same as number 1793.)
3932. Matthias FARNSWORTH. (Same as number 790.)
3933. Mary FARR. (Same as number 3913.)
3934. Capt. Jonas PRESCOTT617,325, 9G Grandfather, son of 1682. John PRESCOTT & 1683. Mary PLATTS-GAWKROGER. Born in Jun 1648 in Lancaster, Massachusetts.618 Died in Groton, Massachusetts, on 31 Dec 1723.619,620 Buried in Groton, Massachusetts.619

(Details of Children to be entered from Butler’s History.)

According to Green’s Epitaphs621, the name Prescott “is the most distinguished name in the annals of Groton, and the families bearing it have been numerous. Jonas, the progenitor, was the son of John and Mary (Platts) Prescott, and was born at Lancaster, in June, 1648. He was a blacksmith by trade, and owned the mill in the south part of Groton, now within the limits of Harvard. It is said that a grant of land made by the town, about the year 1675, when it was much in need of a blacksmith, induced him to remove nearer to the village. He built a house and shop on the lot, which was situated on the easterly side of James’s Brook, perhaps a third of a mile south of Lawrence Academy. He bought lands, until he became one of the largest owners of real estate in the town. Two years ago, a piece of wall was removed, which separated a part of this lot from the highway, near where it forks from the Boston road, and which contained a stone bearing this inscription: --

“I. P./1680/Rebuilt by/O. P./1784/Rebuilt by/S. J. Park/1841.

“The initials I. P. are those of Jonas Prescott, and O. P. those of his grandson, Dr. Oliver Prescott.

“Jonas married, December 14, 1672, Mary, daughter of John and Mary (Draper) Loker, of Sudbury, and they had four sons and eight daughters. Two of the sons died young, but all the other children lived to grow up and have families. The eight daughters, with one exception, married Groton men, and were blessed with numerous offspring. Jonas filled many important positions in the town, and represented it in the General Court during the years 1699 and 1705; he died December 31, 1723, aged 75 years.”

Jonas Prescott was captain of the Groton company during Queen Anne’s War (see Green’s Indian Wars)622 and was also grandfather of Col. William Prescott, the commander at Bunker Hill.
He married Mary LOKER92,325, 9G Grandmother.
They had the following children:
1967i.
Mary, 8G Grandmother (1674-)
ii.
Elizabeth428, 9G Aunt (1676-)
iii.
Jonas428, 9G Uncle (1678-)
iv.
Nathaniel428 (Died as Infant), 9G Uncle (1680-1681)
v.
Dorothy428, 9G Aunt (1681-)
vi.
James428 (Died as Child), 9G Uncle (1684-1704)
vii.
Sarah428, 9G Aunt (1686-)
viii.
Abigail428, 9G Aunt (1688-)
ix.
Martha428, 9G Aunt (1690-)
x.
Susanna428, 9G Aunt (1691-)
xi.
Benjamin428, 9G Uncle (1695-)
xii.
_____, 9G Aunt
3935. Mary LOKER92,325, 9G Grandmother, daughter of 7870. John LOKER & 7871. Mary DRAPER. Born on 28 Sep 1653 in Sudbury, Massachusetts. Died in Groton, Massachusetts, on 28 Oct 1735.623,624 Buried in Groton, Massachusetts.623

According to Butler’s History of Groton625, “A romantic story has come down, by family tradition, to the present generation, of the courtship of this loving pair of fruitful progenitors, and is still preserved with much accuracy, it is presumed, as a nursery tale. John Loker, of whom we have no other account than as connected with this affair, is said to have been wealthy, and he and his wife to have been somewhat aristocratic in their feelings and notions. Having only one daughter, and she exceedingly fair and of good promise, they disdained to betroth her to a blacksmith, the son of a blacksmith, however rich and otherwise unexceptionable he might be. They had set their hearts upon Mary’s marrying a lawyer. So when they found that there was a strong attachment bewteen their idol, the fair Mary, and the young blacksmith, they remonstrated, but unwitting pursued a direct course to foster and strengthen it. They forbade his entering their house, or having any communication whatever with their daughter; and the more effectually to prevent any intercourse, they grated the windows of her apartment in the house; and when they thought there was any danger of an interview between them, they locked her in. Jonas, however, was not to be baffled by grates and locks. He took opportunities, when the cold night wind blew, and the pelting storm raged, when no listener could overhear the soft whispering of true lovers, to place himself beneath her grated window, and there enjoy the sweet communion with his dearly-beloved. Their intercourse was soon discovered by the chagrined parents; and the next expedient resorted to was to place Mary in some secluded spot, under the care of some watchful and faithful guardian. Chockset, now called Sterling, then a frontier settlement, was chosen as the place of her seclusion. Jonas searched [p. 288] the country around, and made diligent inquiry to find the place of her banishment, for some time in vain. At length, being one day in the wilds of Chockset, he made his usual inquiry of some young men he saw, if they had any pretty girls in their neighborhood. They told him there was to be a quilting that very day, where all the girls would be; that they themselves were going in the evening to dance with them, and invited him to be one of the party, where he might see for himself. He cheerfully accepted the invitation; and on arriving at the cottage where the seamstresses of the settlement were assembled, whom should he there find, but his adored Mary Loker. This was indeed a happy adventure. Concealing, as well as they could, their former acquaintance, they took opportunities to be partners in the dance, and made assignments for future meetings. Having thus fortunately discovered the place of her banishment, he renewed his visits, till her parents finding it out, took her home. She was then sternly told, that she must reject the blacksmith, and receive the addresses of the lawyer. She resolutely replied, ‘she would never marry to anyone but Jonas Prescott.’ The rejoinder was, ‘Then you shall never have a farthing of our property.’ To this there was a general demurrer; a decree for marriage without dowry followed. The consummation took place before even the most common utensils for housekeeping could be procured; (some delay might have been made, to see if the old folks would not relent, and provide her some;) the tradition positively asserts, that her only implement for boiling was a two quart kettle, and her wash-tub, the shell of a large pumpkin. From this happy pair sprung the doctors, warriors, civilians, statesmen, noticed in the text; with other numerous descendants, of whom Mary lived to see one hundred and seventy-five.”

Unfortunately for this story, Threlfall reports that Mary’s father John Loker died 18 June 1653 at Sudbury, three months before Mary was born. “(See Newton Genealogy p. 17-18 for a full transcript of the will.)”626 If this is correct, then the story above cannot be correct as it is reported. Perhaps Mary Loker’s mother remarried and the story actually pertains to a step father, or perhaps it is entirely a fiction.

Green’s Epitaphs627 reproduces Mary Loker’s gravestone from the Old Burying Ground in Groton: “HERE LIES BURIED/YE BODY OF YE/WIDOW MARY/PRESCOTT RELICKS/OF JONAS PRESCOTT/ESQR WHO DECD/OCTOBR YE 28SH A D/1735 IN YE 82D/YEAR OF HER AGE”
3936. Isaac STEARNS628, 9G Grandfather. Born by about 1600 in England. Immigrated in 1630 Winthrop Fleet. on 18 May 1631. Died in Watertown, Massachusetts, on 19 Jun 1671.

The immigrant Isaac Stearns has been well studied by many genealogists, beginning with Bond197 who published an extensive account of Isaac’s descendants, an account that was the basis of Van Wagenen’s Stearns Genealogy156. More recently Isaac himself has received a full treatment in Anderson’s GMB266, and Threlfall’s GMC50268 has traced the English origins of Isaac’s wife Mary Barker. I follow Anderson here for information about Isaac himself, and Van Wegenen (supplemented by Bond and Threlfall) for information about Isaac’s descendants. The ancestry of Isaac’s wife Mary Barker follows Threlfall’s GMC50.

Details from Anderson to be entered.
He married Mary BARKER266, 9G Grandmother on 20 May 1622 Stoke Nayland, Suffolk, England.629
They had the following children:
i.
John266, 9G Uncle (bp. 1623-1668)
ii.
Mary266, 9G Aunt (bp. 1626-<1663)
iii.
Anna (Hannah)266, 9G Aunt (bp. 1628-)
1968iv.
Isaac, 8G Grandfather (1633-1676)
v.
Sarah266, 9G Aunt (1635-1700)
vi.
Samuel266, 9G Uncle (1638-1683)
vii.
Elizabeth266, 9G Aunt (~1644-1671)
viii.
Abigail266, 9G Aunt (~1646-)
3937. Mary BARKER266, 9G Grandmother, daughter of 7874. John BARKER & 7875. Margaret WALTER. Born abt 1600 in England.630 Died on 23 Apr 1677. Immigrated in 1630 Winthrop Fleet.

The Stearns Genealogy gives Mary (Barker) Stearns’ death date as 2 Apr 1677, but Anderson (citing Watertown VR 42) gives it as 23 Apr 1677.
3938. Capt. Richard BEERS631, 9G Grandfather, son of 7876. James BEERS & 7877. Hester _____. Immigrated by 1633. 16 Mar 1636/7. Will dated on 6 Aug 1675. Died in Northfield, Massachusetts, on 4 Sep 1675. Will proved on 5 Aug 1675.

Bond’s Watertown632 provides the following details on the life of Richard Beers: “Capt. RICHARD BEERS, an original proprietor, adm. freeman Mar. 16, 1636-7; selectman most of the time from 1644 to 1675; Representative 13 yrs., 1663-75; a captain in King Philip’s War, and slain in battle by the Indians at Northfield, Sept. 4, 1675. Wife ELIZABETH. He made a nuncupatory will, Aug. 6, proved Oct. 5, 1675 -- whole estate to go to his wife; but if she marry, 1/2 to go to dr. Sternes and other children. Wid. and son Eleazer admin. Inventory, £242. In the Probate Office of Middlesex, is an agreement, dated June, 1711, among the children and heirs of Capt. R. Beers, viz., Elnathan, Jabez, Richard, Sarah Wheeler; heirs of Mary Rice, d. viz. Joseph and Mary Rice; Judith Allen, Elizabeth and Samuel Ward, and David Stone. Oct. 1654, he was recommended to the Court by Hugh Mason, Thomas Hastings, Charles Chadwick, Henry Bright, and John Sherman, ‘to keep an ordinary.’ His license was renewed, and probably continued until his decease. It is the first notice of a public house in the town.” Bond later633 corrects this last observation: “CAPTAIN BEERS was not the first one authorized ‘to keep an ordinary.’ See G. Munnings and T. Wincoll, in Part II.”

Schultz and Tougias’ excellent volume King Philip’s War634 gives a detailed account of the battle, known as Beers’ Ambush, in which Richard Beers was killed. This battle took place 4 September 1675 on the east side of the Connecticut River south of Squakeag (now Northfield). Beers and his company were marching north from Hadley to the aid of Squakeag, which had come under attack two days before. As they descended into a ravine to cross a brook, they were attacked and many of Beers’s men were killed. Beers himself and some of the survivors retreated into another ravine about three-quarters of a mile to the south, but they were attacked again and Beers was killed. With respect to Beers’ gravesite Schultz and Tougias write:635 “A marker on the east side of Route 63 near the Community Bible Church designates the general area of Beers’ last stand. The site of Beers’ grave can be found at the base of the main building of the Linden Hill School near the intersection of South Mountain Road and Lyman Hill Road. A modern stone marker indicated the burial spot. Temple and Sheldon, writing in 1875, provide a glimpse as to how the site was altered before the present stone marker was set.

“‘The tradition which marks this as the spot where Capt. Beers was killed and buried, is of undoubted authenticity. The old men in each generation have told the same story, and identified the place. And the [p. 167] existence here from time immemorial of two stones -- like head and foot stones -- set at the proper distance apart, certainly marks the place of a grave; and the care to erect stones indicates the grave of more than a common soldier. The new house of Capt. Samuel Merriman, built about 50 years ago, was set directly across the ravine, which was made to answer for a cellar by filling in the space front and rear. Capt. Ira Coy informs the writer that, before anything was disturbed, he and Capt. M. dug into the grave. They found the well defined sides and bottom, where the spade had left the clay solid; and at the depth of about twenty inches (the shallowness indicating haste) was a layer of dark colored mold, some of it in small lumps, like decayed bones. The grave was then filled up, a large flat stone laid over it, and the hollow graded up.’636

Richard Beers’ ancestry is traced at: http://info.lu.farmingdale.edu/~betzja/gene/d0000/g0000048.html#I2076 (details to be entered).
He married Elizabeth FIRMIN266, 9G Grandmother.
They had the following children:
i.
Sarah197, 9G Aunt
1969ii.
Sarah, 8G Grandmother (-1724)
iii.
Mary197, 9G Aunt (1643-1677)
iv.
Elnathan197, 9G Uncle (-1696)
v.
Judith197, 9G Aunt (1646-)
vi.
Jabez197, 9G Uncle (1651-)
vii.
Elizabeth197, 9G Aunt
viii.
Richard197, 9G Uncle (1659-)
ix.
Abigail197, 9G Aunt (1662-1662)
3939. Elizabeth FIRMIN266, 9G Grandmother, daughter of 7878. John FIRMIN & 7879. _____ _____. Born on 27 Apr 1615 in Nayland, Suffolk, England. Died in Watertown, Massachusetts, on 16 Jun 1706. Immigrated in 1630.

The identity of Richard Beers’ wife as Elizabeth Firmin is not absolutely established, but it is suggested by Anderson266 who notes in his treatment of John Firmin (with square brackets in the original): “In the Boston Newsletter for 24 June 1706 is the notice of death in Watertown on 16 June of that year of ‘Mrs. Elizabeth Beers (widow of Capt. John [recte Richard] Beers...) in the 92 year of her age.... She came to New England in June 1630 being then sixteen year old, and lived in New England 76 years.’ This would be the right age for the Elizabeth who was baptized to John Firmin in Nayland, and her husband did acquire the estate of John Firmin. He acquired it, however, from a person who had purchased the land from the heirs of John Firmin, and we would have to assume that Richard Beers and his wife had been parties to the sale to Barnabas Fawer, and then had turned around and repurchased the land from him.”637
3968. John CUMMINGS55, 9G Grandfather, son of 7936. Isaac CUMMINGS & 7937. Anne _____. Died in Dunstable, Massachusetts, on 1 Dec 1700.638 was baptized on 9 May 1630 in Mistley, Essex, England.638

According to Mooar’s Descendants of Isaac Cummings639, “2. JOHN CUMMINGS (Isaac1) married Sarah Howlett. She was a daughter of Serg’t Thos. and Alice (French) Howlet, who was a commoner, 3 Mar. 1634, Repr. 1635, granted a house lot in Woburn, 1635, purchased 40 acres there, 1637, serg’t 1643, ensign 1646, had one share and a half in Plum Island (Ipswich) 1666, and died, 1668 (78?) ae. 79. His wife, Alice, died June 26, 166- (6?), and he left a widow Rebekah, who died in Newbury, Nov. 1, 1680. Sarah had a brother William, at whose request, John Howlet, a nephew of Wm., deeded, May 20, 1715, 70 acres in Ipswich to her grandson, Joseph Cummings. John Cummings, (listed among the commoners, 1672) by his father’s will, 1677, was made sole executor and given the ‘house and lands, 40 acres more or less,’ from which were to be paid the legacies to other heirs. In 1661, he was taxed 10s. in Rowley Village (Boxford). Four hundred acres were laid off there to him and Thomas Dorman and Robert Stiles. This was bordered on the west by the Andover line. In 1678-9, he is spoken of as ‘a gatherer’ in Boxford of a rate ‘to procure powder and bullets.’ Both himself and wife were members of the Topsfield church and dismissed, but he ‘without recommendation,’ Dec. 6th 1685. But on the 16th of the same month he was one of several males mentioned as having entered into a covenant to form the church in Dunstable. He had become a proprietor, one of the first fourteen proprietors, of that new town, some three years before, Nov. 30, 1682. Jonathan Tyng deeded lands to him and to Isaac, John Jr., and Thomas Cummings at the same time, Jan. 29, 1683. He was a selectman in 1682, and for several years town clerk. He died Dec. 1, 1700, and his wife Dec. 7, following.

“Of his children, Nathaniel, Thomas, Sarah, William, El-[p. 6]iezer, Benjamin and Samuel are recorded in the Essex County records at Salem. The birthdays of the others are not known. As respects Isaac and Ebenezer, Fox’s Dunstable says: ‘These two were either killed by the Indians or drowned, as they died Nov. 2, 1688, and were not buried for many days after.’ Mr. Kimball Webster, of Hudson, N. H., quotes from Dunstable records as follows: ‘Isaac Cummings, son of John and Sarah, departed the 2 Nov., and was buried the 20th Nov. 1688.’” A list of John Cummings’ children follows.

Abbott Lowell Cummings640 has reported in detail on the possible connections between this John Cummings and his son Abraham, and the so-called “Woburn John” Cummings whose ancestry has not yet been established.
He married Sarah HOWLETT55,641, 9G Grandmother by 1658.
They had the following children:
1984i.
John, 8G Grandfather (~1658->1732)
ii.
Dea. Thomas55, 9G Uncle (1658-1723)
iii.
Nathaniel55, 9G Uncle (1659-)
iv.
Sarah55, 9G Aunt (1661-)
v.
Abraham55,640, 9G Uncle (-<1707)
vi.
Isaac55, 9G Uncle (-1688)
vii.
Ebenezer55, 9G Uncle (-1688)
viii.
William55 (Twin), 9G Uncle (1671-1672)
ix.
Eliezer55 (Twin), 9G Uncle (1671-)
x.
Benjamin55, 9G Uncle (1673-)
xi.
Samuel55, 9G Uncle (1677-)
3969. Sarah HOWLETT55,641, 9G Grandmother, daughter of 7938. Ens. Thomas HOWLETT & 7939. Alice FRENCH. Born say 1639.641 Died in Dunstable, Massachusetts, on 7 Dec 1700.638
3970. Samuel KINGSLEY642, 9G Grandfather. Died in Billerica, Massachusetts, on 21 May 1662.
He married Hannah BRACKETT642,643, 9G Grandmother by 1656.
They had one child:
1985i.
Elisabeth, 8G Grandmother (-1706)
3971. Hannah BRACKETT642,643, 9G Grandmother, daughter of 7942. Capt. Richard BRACKETT & 7943. Alice BLOWER. Died in Dunstable, Massachusetts, on 3 Jul 1706. was baptized 4 Jan 1634/5 in Boston, Massachusetts.

According to Threlfall644, the children of Richard Brackett and Alice Blower included “HANNAH, bapt. 4 Jan. 1634/5 in Boston; m 1, Samuel Kingsley who d 21 May 1662 in Billerica; 3 ch.; m 2, John Blanchard who d 1693 in Dunstable (now Nashua, N.H.). She was killed by Indians in Dunstable 3 July 1706; 11 ch.”
3984. John LAWRENCE197, 9G Grandfather. Will dated on 24 Apr 1667. Died in Groton, Massachusetts, on 11 Jul 1667.645 Will proved on 1 Oct 1667. Immigrated by 1636. on 17 Apr 1637.

The first three generations of Lawrences and their connections with Tarbells, Holdens, and Morses are highly complex, with several Johns, Hannahs, and other common names in each generation, and with multiple marriages. The information provided here may not be entirely correct.

This treatment of the immigrant John Lawrence and his descendants follows Bond’s Watertown646, but I have rejected Bond’s Appendix III on John Lawrence’s ancestry. This appendix was based on the work of Horatio B. Somerby and is now regarded as spurious (Moriarty in TAG, Oct. 1933; TAG July 1942; not seen).

According to Bond647 (with square brackets in the original), John Lawrence “settled in Watertown, probably in 1635, as his eldest child was born there, Mar. 14, 1635-6. His name is on the earliest list of proprietors extant, and he was adm. freeman Ap. 17, 1637. The date of his arrival in America has not been ascertained, nor is it known whether he was married before or after his arrival. Nothing has yet been ascertained from American records or archives, with respect to his parentage or ancestry. It has been supposed that he was the John Lawrence [[a footnote on some of the passengers of the Planter appears here]] of great St. Albans, Hertfordshire, who embarked in the Planter, for New England, in 1635, then aged 17 years. This is evidently a mistake, as the passenger in the Planter was only 19 years old when John Lawrence, of Watertown, was admitted freeman.

“By his first wife, ELIZABETH, he had 12 children, all born between his settlement in Watertown, and his removal to Groton, whither he moved in the autumn of 1662. His wife, Elizabeth, d. there the next summer, Aug. 29, 1663, and he m. (2d), Nov. 2, 1664, SUSANNAH BATCHELDER, dr. of William Batchelder, of Charlestown. He d. July 11, 1667, and his wid. Susanna d. July 8, 1668. His Will, dated Ap. 24, proved Oct. 1, 1667, appoints his wife, and sons Nathaniel and Joseph, ex’rs; mentions sons Enoch, Samuel, Isaac, Jonathan, and Zechariah; of the three at home, Elizabeth ‘to live with Mr. Ensigne Buss, of Concord, till of age; the other two, Enoch and Zechariah, be trust to Samuel Willard and William Lakin, till of age.’ To his dr. Mary he gave only half a portion with the rest, ‘to teach her a remembrance of her disobedience and unfaithfulness to me in my distress.’ [She had married two days before the decease of her mother.] Inventory, £278 0s. 4d. House and 10 acres of land, from the street to the hill, taking an equal breadth, apprized at £60. The Will of his wid. Susanna, dated at Charlestown, July, proved Dec. 16, 1668, mentions her two daughters, Abigail and Susanna; her father and mother Bachelder; two sisters, Rachel Atwood and Abigail Asting; her father Bachelder, and brother Atwood, of Malden, ex’rs.

“The date of his removal to Groton is determined with sufficient precision by the following facts. Oct. 23, 1662, he sold land in Watertown to John Barnard. Oct. 27, 1662, he sold another lot to William Page, and on the same day another lot to Joseph Underwood, and on the same day he sold to John Biscoe his homestead in Watertown, a dwelling-house, &c., and about thirteen acres, ‘being the now mansion-house of said John Lawrence,’ bounded on the E. by the highway; N. by Timothy Hawkins and John Hammond; W. by the meadow of said Biscoe; S. by land of John Flemming, deceased; wid. Dix, and her sonne; wid. Bartlett, and said Biscoe. In Dec. 1662, ‘meet men were found amongst the inhabitants [of Groton], when Dea. James Parker, John Lawrence, William Martin, Richard Blood, and James Fiske, were chosen selectmen’ [Butler, p. 17]. His early admission as freeman, and this election to the first board of selectmen of Groton, show that he was well known, and of good repute. According to the list of possessions in Watertown in 1642, he then owned 7 lots, amounting to 154 1/2 acres. In legal instruments he was designated a carpenter, although, from the amount of his land, it might be presumed that he was chiefly devoted to agriculture. The birth [[p. 820]] of his dr. Elizabeth is recorded in Boston, and as no births of his family are recorded in Wat., from 1649 until 1659, perhaps he resided in Boston for several years, in the exercise of his trade.” A record of his children follows.
He married Elizabeth COOKE197, 9G Grandmother abt 1635.
They had the following children:
i.
John197, 9G Uncle (1636-)
ii.
Jonathan197, 9G Uncle
3674iii.
Nathaniel, 9G Grandfather (1639-1724)
iv.
Joseph197 (Died as Infant), 9G Uncle (1642-1642)
v.
Joseph197, 9G Uncle (1643-)
vi.
Mary197, 9G Aunt (1645-~1686)
1992vii.
Peleg, 8G Grandfather (1647-1692)
viii.
Enoch (Enosh)61,197, 9G Uncle (1649-1744)
ix.
Samuel197, 9G Uncle
x.
Isaac197, 9G Uncle
xi.
Elizabeth197, 9G Aunt (1655-)
xii.
Jonathan197, 9G Uncle (-1725)
xiii.
Zechariah197, 9G Uncle (1659-)
3985. Elizabeth COOKE197, 9G Grandmother, daughter of 7970. Aaron COOKE & 7971. Elizabeth CHARD. Born on 8 Sep 1611 in Wisset, Norwich, Suffolk, England. Died in Groton, Massachusetts, on 29 Aug 1663. Immigrated ? .

Various sources give her surname as either Waters or Kettleborough.

Torrey648 gives her surname as Cooke. The details of her birth and ancestry given here come from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~stanfam and should be confirmed.
3986. Joseph MORSE323, 9G Grandfather, son of 7972. Samuel MORSE & 7973. Elizabeth JASPER. Born in 1615 in Redgrave, Suffolk, England. Died in Dedham, Massachusetts, in 1654. Immigrated in 1635 “Increase” from London.

Joseph Morse and Hannah Phillips are ancestors of U.S. President Calvin Coolidge.533

Data from Savage to be entered.
He married Hannah PHILLIPS323, 9G Grandmother on 1 Sep 1638 Dedham, Massachusetts.197
They had the following children:
1993i.
Elizabeth, 8G Grandmother (1647-1715)
ii.
Sarah197, 9G Aunt (1643-1684)
3987. Hannah PHILLIPS323, 9G Grandmother. Born in 1617. Died in Boston, Massachusetts, on 3 Oct 1676. Buried on 6 Oct 1676. Will dated in 1676.197 Immigrated ? .

There were several persons named Phillips among the early settlers of Watertown, Massachusetts, and the relationships among them are not known. In an entry for one Henry Phillips, Bond’s Watertown649 reports: “What affinity there was, if any, between Rev. George Phillips [Watertown’s first minister], this Henry Phillips, and Hannah Phillips ‘of Watertown,’ who m., Sept. 1, 1638, Joseph Morse, first of Dedham, afterwards of Medfield, has not been ascertained.... Hannah, wid. of Joseph Morse, m., in 1658, Thomas Boyden, an early settler of Watertown, then said to be of Medfield. In her Will, dated 1676, she mentions he daughters Elizabeth and Sarah Lawrence”. Note that these two daughters, Elizabeth and Sarah, married two Lawrence brothers, Peleg and Nathaniel Lawrence.
3992. John TUTTLE232, 9G Grandfather, son of 7984. Simon TUTTLE & 7985. Isabel WELLS. was baptized on 4 Jun 1596 in Holcott, Northamptonshire, England. Died in Carrickfergus, Ireland, on 30 Dec 1656. Immigrated in 1635 “Planter”.

John Tuttle immigrated “on Planter 1635 with wife, her mother and her Lawrence children and his four children. Family settled in Ipswich, Mass. In 1651 John returned to England with daughter Hannah. He established himself in Carricksburg [apparently an error for Carrickfergus], Ireland and died there. She [John’s wife Joan] was widow of Thomas Lawrence and had 4 children by him.”512

For a comprehensive modern treatment of this immigrant see Anderson 2011: 125-135 (GM 1634-1635 T-Y).
He married Joan ANTROBUS437, 9G Grandmother by 1628.
They had the following children:
i.
Abigail232, 9G Aunt (bp. 1628->1674)
1996ii.
Simon, 8G Grandfather (bp. 1631-)
iii.
Sarah232, 9G Aunt (bp. 1632-<1674)
iv.
John232, 9G Uncle (bp. 1634-<1674)
v.
Hannah232, 9G Aunt (~1636-)
3993. Joan ANTROBUS437, 9G Grandmother, daughter of 7986. Walter ANTROBUS & 7987. Joan ARNOLD. was baptized on 25 Jun 1592 in St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England. Died aft 1659.232 Immigrated in 1635 “Planter”.

With her first husband John Lawrence, Joan Antrobus is an ancestor of U.S. President Taft533 and author Nathaniel Hawthorne,417 and with her second husband John Tuttle she is an ancestor also of the historian William Hickling Prescott.417
3994. John COGSWELL513, 9G Grandfather, son of 7988. Edward COGSWELL & 7989. Alice _____. was baptized on 7 Apr 1592 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Died in Ipswich, Massachusetts, on 29 Nov 1669. Buried in Ipswich, Massachusetts (Old North Graveyard). Immigrated in 1635 “Angel Gabriel” from Bristol to Pemaquid, Maine.

Donald James Cogswell’s large volume Descendants of John Cogswell513 is a comprehensive record of the line of John and Elizabeth (Thompson) Cogswell through fifteen generations, based on information supplied by the descendants themselves. John and Elizabeth are ancestors of a number of noted people including U.S. Presidents John Adams, John Quincy Adams, and Calvin Coolidge,533 of Diana, Princess of Wales, of jurist Oliver Wendell Holmes, and of authors Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Julia Ward Howe, William Hickling Prescott, and Edward Arlington Robinson.417

Their ship, the “Angel Gabriel,” was wrecked in a storm 15 Aug 1635 on arrival at Pemaquid, Maine, and many passengers were lost. The Cogswell family were all washed ashore alive, but lost nearly all their possessions.

Details to be entered.
He married Elizabeth THOMPSON513, 9G Grandmother on 10 Sep 1615 Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.
They had one child:
1997i.
Sarah, 8G Grandmother (~1632-1732)
3995. Elizabeth THOMPSON513, 9G Grandmother, daughter of 7990. Rev. William THOMPSON & 7991. Elizabeth _____. Born abt 1594 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Died in Ipswich, Massachusetts, on 2 Jun 1676. Buried in Ipswich, Massachusetts (Old North Graveyard). Immigrated in 1635 “Angel Gabriel” from Bristol to Pemaquid, Maine.
3996. Rev. Nathaniel ROGERS650, 9G Grandfather, son of 7992. Rev. John (“Roaring John”) ROGERS & 7993. _____ _____. Born abt 1598 in Haverhill, Suffolk, England. Died on 3 Jul 1655. Will proved on 26 Sep 1655. Immigrated in Nov 1636 London to Boston. on 23 May 1639.

Savage provides an extraordinarily long entry on Nathaniel Rogers in which he refutes the claim that Nathaniel is a descendant of the “proto-martyr” of Queen Mary’s reign. Details to be entered.

According to Morison,651 Nathaniel Rogers was “born at Haverhill, Suffolk, 1598, the second son of ‘Roaring John’ Rogers (B.A. 1592, lecturer at Dedham and author of Doctrine of Faith) by his first wife, Bridget Ray. John’s father was brother to Richard Rogers, father of Ezekiel (q.v.). Admitted sizar at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, 1614; scholar; B.A. 1617-18; M.A. 1621; ordained 1619; curate at Bocking, Essex; rector of Assington, Suffolk, 1630. Emigrating with his wife in 1636, in the same ship with Ralph Partridge, he succeeded Nathaniel Ward as pastor of the church of Ipswich in 1638; John Norton was his colleague. ‘An able disputant, whose mouth the Lord was pleased to fill with many arguments for the defence of his truth’ (Johnson, W.W.P., p. 88). Died July 3, 1655. Father of President John Rogers (A.B. Harvard 1649), Ezekiel Rogers (A.B. 1659), and Mary, who married William Hubbard (A.B. 1642). Waters, G.G.E., I. 209-36.”

Cotton Mather provides a biographical account of Nathaniel Rogers in his Magnalia.
He married Margaret CRANE4, 9G Grandmother on 23 Jan 1625.4
They had one child:
1998i.
Samuel, 8G Grandfather (1635-1693)
New England genealogy files of Robert J. O’Hara, automatically output by Reunion for Macintosh. For additional genealogical data in other formats, including specialized lists of immigrant ancestors and notable kin, please visit my main genealogy page: http://rjohara.net/gen/ For information about many of the localities mentioned here please visit NewEnglandTowns.org: http://newenglandtowns.org